Jimmy Kimmel tweets a sweet update on 3-month-old son

Image: YOUTUBE/JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE

Months after revealing his newborn son’s diagnosis with a serious heart condition, Jimmy Kimmel says that little Billy is “doing great.”

The Jimmy Kimmel Live host shared an extremely cute photo (that smile!) of the 3-month-old baby on Friday. He also encouraged fans to call their representatives and senators a particularly urgent request as Republicans continue to blather on about repealing the Affordable Care Act.

“Thx for the love & support,” Kimmel tweeted. “Please remind your Congresspeople that every kid deserves the care he got.”

The update comes after Kimmel dedicated a Jimmy Kimmel Live monologue to Billy in May, shortly after the child was diagnosed with Tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary artesia and underwent open-heart surgery.

“In layman’s terms,” Kimmel said at the time, “the pulmonary valve was completely blocked.”

He also called for Congress to prioritize care for people who have pre-existing conditions even if those patients don’t have the financial means to pay for care themselves.

“If your baby is about to die, it shouldn’t matter how much money you make,” Kimmel said. “This isn’t football. There are no teams. We are the team it’s the United States. Don’t let their partisan squabbles divide us.”

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/22/jimmy-kimmel-update-son-heart-condition/

Calls for UN meeting as clashes continue in Jerusalem and West Bank

Jerusalem (CNN)Clashes between Palestinian protesters and Israeli security forces broke out again across Jerusalem and the West Bank on Saturday, with the mood tremendously intense around Jerusalem’s Old City.

A Palestinian man died at a hospital Saturday evening after he was injured in clashes with Israeli forces earlier, the Palestinian Ministry of Health said.
The man was involved in a clash in the town of el-Eizariyah near Jerusalem, the official Palestinian news agency, WAFA, reported.
    Meantime, a rocket fired from northern Gaza exploded midair Sunday morning local time, with no injuries reported, the Israeli Defense Forces tweeted.
    With tensions rapidly rising, Palestinians called for more protests Sunday and the Israeli government planned meetings.
    One security session was expected to discuss the recent implementation of metal detectors at entrances to a key holy site in the Old City.
    The restrictions were imposed after two Israeli police officers were killed in a shooting last week just outside the Old City and Temple Mount, also known as the Noble Sanctuary. The area is one of the world’s most important religious sites, revered by Christians, Jews and Muslims.
    Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas on Friday suspended all contacts with Israel until the metal detectors are removed.
    “I announce the freezing of contacts with Israel on all levels and the suspension of coordination until all the measures taken at al-Aqsa mosque have stopped,” Abbas said in a message tweeted by his Fatah Movement.
    The Temple Mount/Noble Sanctuary was closed after last Friday’s attack, and reopened Sunday for worshippers, visitors and tourists, with added security measures.

    It is home to the Western Wall — which was part of the walls around the Second Jewish Temple and is one of the holiest places for Jews to pray — and the Dome of the Rock, where Muslims believe the Prophet Mohammed ascended to heaven.
    Egypt, France and Sweden called Saturday for United Nations Security Council consultations Monday on ways to lower tensions in Jerusalem, Sweden’s chief political officer at the United Nations wrote on Twitter.
    The envoys of the Middle East Quartet — the United States, Russia, the European Union and the United Nations — said in a statement they are “deeply concerned by the escalating tensions and violent clashes taking place in and around the Old City of Jerusalem.”
    The statement went on to say, “They strongly condemn acts of terror, express their regret for all loss of innocent life caused by the violence and hope for a speedy recovery to the wounded.”
    Noting the particular sensitivities surrounding the holy sites of Jerusalem, and the need to ensure security, the Quartet envoys called on all sides to show restraint, refrain from provocative actions and work toward de-escalating the situation.
    They added: “Envoys welcome the assurances by the Prime Minister of Israel that the status quo at the holy sites in Jerusalem will be upheld and respected.”

    Victims identified

    Three people killed Friday in an attack in the Halamish settlement in the northern West Bank were identified by Israeli police on Saturday.
    Police Superintendent and spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said on Twitter, “Names of three Israelis murdered in Friday night attack by Palestinian terrorist, Yosef Solomon age 70, Chaya Solomon age 46, Elad Solomon age 36.”
    The Israeli army said the three Israelis were killed when a young Palestinian man from a nearby village breached the security of the settlement and carried out a stabbing attack. The Palestinian, who was shot and wounded at the scene, is in custody.
    A fourth Israeli was wounded in the attack, Magen David Adom, Israel’s ambulance service, told CNN.
    Three Palestinians were killed and many people reportedly were hurt during clashes Friday.
    Mohammad Fityani, a spokesman for the Palestinian Red Crescent in Jerusalem, told CNN its crews had dealt with 109 injured people by 3 p.m. local time, and that 72 of them were taken to the hospital.
    Tensions in Jerusalem’s Old City boiled over into skirmishes after the midday prayer.
    In one instance, a CNN team outside Herod’s Gate saw Israeli police start forcefully pushing worshipers back and pointing their weapons at them. The officers then fired rubber bullets and stun grenades to disperse the worshipers and move them back.

    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/22/middleeast/jerusalem-west-bank-clashes/index.html

    VCs love insurance, even if you dont

    Most people hate shopping for insurance, and they dont enjoy talking about it either. Thats probably why youre unlikely to hear about the industrys current transformation in conversation, even in startup circles.

    But make no mistake, there are vast sums of venture dollars going into insurance deals. Investment has risen dramatically, with VCs betting that, in the coming years, well see major shifts in both how we buy insurance and what types of items we insure with it.

    So far this year, insurance-focused startups (excluding the Asian continent*) have raised more than $700 million, almost as much as they raised in all of 2016, which was itself an especially busy year for the space. Much of the funding boom comes from big insurers themselves, who are backing and leading more rounds for insurance startups, as well as companies in related areas like financial services. In the chart below, we look at funding growth over the past four years:

    Insurance investment totals are heavily driven by a few large rounds. Over the past year, the two biggest funding recipients are tech-enabled health insurer Bright Health and pay-by-the-mile auto insurerMetromile, which raised$160 millionand$153 million, respectively. In 2016, health insurance providerOscar Healthtook in$400 millionin growth funding, more than 40 percent of all insurance startup investment.

    At first blush it may seem like insurance and venture capital make an odd couple.

    There are plenty of smaller and mid-sized rounds getting done, too. Over the past year, at least 75 companies in the insurance space have raised rounds of $1 million or more, and about a quarter of those were for $20 million or more. They cover a big range of business models, as well, including new insurance categories, online platforms for comparing and purchasing coverage and tools for providers to better assess risk.

    One might be inclined to call these startups industry disruptors except that their biggest supporters seem to be long-established players in the space.

    We hear you like insurance

    As mentioned, a sizeable chunk of the financing comes from insurance companies themselves, many of whom have dedicated venture arms. The most active by round count looks to beAXA Strategic Ventures, the VC arm of French multinational insurer AXA. The two-year-old fund has invested intwo dozen companiesover the past two years, including a$6.5 millionround it led this month forQLoo, a celebrity-backed developer of AI-powered tools for mapping cultural tastes.MassMutual Ventures, the VC arm of insurance giant MassMutual, has also been keeping busy,backing 16 companiesover the past three years. In the chart below we look at a few:

    Well-known venture firms are also leading significant rounds.New Enterprise Associates, for instance, backed both Metromile and Bright Health, along withIndio, a seed-stage commercial insurance startup.AccelandBessemerhave also each made three insurance-focused investments in the past couple of years. And over the years, most of the biggest Silicon Valley firms have at least one investment in the space.

    But while it looks like large sums are going into insurance deals, the figures may underestimate the breadth of activity. One reason is that many fast-growing players in the insurance space operate in other industries too, such as financial services. A case in point isCredit Karma, the credit score unicorn that now offers auto insurance quotes alongside offers for credit cards and other financial products.

    What next?

    At first blush it may seem like insurance and venture capital make an odd couple. Venture capital is all about taking big risks for the potential of even bigger payouts down the road, while insurance is all about quantifying and mitigating risk.

    In small allocations, however, venture can actually be a strategy for reducing risk, as it allows large, entrenched players to track and take stakes in the upstart ventures that could reshape their industries. Its worth noting that many of todays largest insurance companies have histories that date back a couple of centuries. They didnt last this long without some ability to adapt to changing times.

    * Crunchbases tally of insurance investment totals excluded Asia, which sees fewer deals but some large ones. The biggest to date is Zhong An, a China-based online insurance company that raised more than $900 million two years ago.

    Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2017/07/22/vcs-love-insurance-even-if-you-dont/

    Consultation on changing legal gender to be launched – BBC News

    Image copyright Getty Images
    Image caption The consultation on the 2004 Gender Recognition Act will begin in the autumn

    The UK government is considering plans to make the process of changing legal gender easier.

    Currently, people must be diagnosed with gender dysphoria, a condition where a person’s biological sex and identity does not match.

    The equalities minister says she wants to reform the 2004 Gender Recognition Act to make the process less intrusive.

    LGBT campaign group Stonewall says the current system is “demeaning and broken”.

    The 2004 law says people wanting a change of gender to be legally recognised in the UK need to apply for a Gender Recognition Certificate.

    This is issued by the Gender Recognition Panel, a judicial body which legally determines what gender an individual defines as.

    As well as a diagnosis of gender dysphoria, the person applying must provide evidence that they have been in transition for at least two years.

    ‘Inclusive society’

    The most recent figures, for the three months between January and March 2017, show that 112 people applied to change their gender, with 88% of those being granted the certificate.

    Equalities Minister Justine Greening said when it was first introduced, the Gender Recognition Act was “cutting edge” but now it needs to be updated.

    The consultation on the law will begin in the autumn, she said.

    “This government is committed to building an inclusive society that works for everyone, no matter what their gender or sexuality, and today we’re taking the next step forward.

    “We will build on the significant progress we have made over the past 50 years, tackling some of the historic prejudices that still persist in our laws and giving LGBT people a real say on the issues affecting them.”

    ‘Huge inequalities’

    The proposals come ahead of the 50th anniversary of Parliament voting for the partial decriminalisation of homosexuality in 1967.

    The Sexual Offences Act 1967 made private homosexual acts between men over the age of 21 legal.

    Suzanna Hopwood, a member of the Stonewall Trans Advisory Group, said reform was a key priority for removing “huge inequalities” for trans people.

    “It’s vital that this reform removes the requirements for medical evidence and an intrusive interview panel, and finally allows all trans people to have their gender legally recognised through a simple administrative process.”

    Ms Greening also launched a survey to get LGBT people to help shape government policy in the future.

    The government wants people to share their experiences of the health service, in education and at work.

    Read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40692782

    Pence calls on GOP to ‘step up to the plate’ on health care bill

    (CNN)Vice President Mike Pence is increasing the pressure for Republicans to pass health care legislation, calling on senators to “step up to the plate” and keep their seven-year promise.

    The elevated rhetoric comes as the Republican health care legislation hangs by a tenuous thread.
    The Senate is expected to vote on a plan to overhaul the Affordable Care Act next week, but what exactly that will be has yet to be announced. The Senate Republican leadership is urging members to pass a procedural vote to begin debate, but with Arizona Sen. John McCain out as he deals with newly diagnosed brain cancer, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell can only lose one member of his conference and still advance a bill.
      As of now, there’s no indication the votes are there.
      “We’re going to vote on whether to proceed to a bill,” Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas said Thursday. “And I know people are fixated on what bill are we going to vote to proceed on — but the problem with that is that this is a unique process where every senator can offer amendments to change the bill. So it really is irrelevant what technical vehicle we proceed to. This is just strictly, are we going to start the debate, so people can offer amendments and so we can at some point finish.”
      President Donald Trump echoed Pence in a tweet Saturday morning.
      “The Republican Senators must step up to the plate and, after 7 years, vote to Repeal and Replace,” Trump wrote. “Next, Tax Reform and Infrastructure. WIN!”
      “ObamaCare is dead and the Democrats are obstructionists, no ideas or votes, only obstruction,” he continued in a follow-up tweet. “It is solely up to the 52 Republican Senators!”
      Pence reiterated the message Saturday night, saying he and the President “are going to keep fighting every single day until this Congress puts this bill on [Trump’s] desk.”
      “President Trump said it plainly the other day when he had every senator over to the White House,” Pence added. “He said he had pen in hand. He’s ready to act and the Senate health care bill, we believe, is the right bill at the right time to begin to repeal and replace Obamacare.”
      For now, the Trump administration is trying to come up with some kind of Obamacare replacement bill that will satisfy moderates. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma has been meeting in both group and individual settings with moderate hold-outs, hoping to convince them that there is a way to protect low-income people in their states once Medicaid expansion ends.
      A new Congressional Budget Office score Thursday showed that Republicans had more than $200 billion more to spend on health care and still make their budget target. That may give leaders and the White House some room to negotiate.
      But spending more money to win votes is making some Republicans uncomfortable.
      “It’s beginning to feel like there is a lack of coherency in what we’re doing, and it’s almost becoming a bidding process. Let’s throw $50 billion here, let’s throw $100 billion there. And again, it may write itself, but it’s making me uncomfortable right now,” said Tennessee Republican Sen. Bob Corker.

      Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/22/politics/pence-ohio-gop-dinner/index.html

      Where the elderly take care of each other — because no one else will

      Tokyo, Japan (CNN)In a elementary school turned nursing home, Tasaka Keichi jokes with a group of cheerful old women.

      At 70, he could be mistakenfor a resident, but Tasaka isn’t thinking of retiring anytime soon. Instead, the former tofu-maker is forging a second career as a caregiver to the elderly in Tokyo’s Cross Hearts nursing home.
      “I always had an interest in care-giving and pensioners don’t receive much in Japan so I’m really thankful that this opportunity existed here for me,” Tasaka told CNN.
        “I’m old too so I can understand what these seniors are going through. I actually feel like I’m hanging out with the residents here as opposed to caring for them”

        Catering to a ‘super-aged’ nation

        With its fast-declining birthrate and growing cohort of old people, Japan is considered a “super-aged” nation, where more than 20% of the population is over 65. By 2020, there will be 13 such countries in the world.

        To cope with a growing labor shortage that’s set to hit the care-giving and industrial sectors the hardest, and in the hopes of reinvigorating a stalling economy, the Japanese government has encouraged more seniors and stay-at-home mothers to re-enter the workforce.
        In many ways, Tasaka is a trailblazer for this incentive. For the past five years, he’s ferried daycare residents to and from their homes, and helped feed and provided companionship to others.
        He lives in one of the facility’s neighboring apartment complexes and is just one of a couple of dozen employees over 65, who work alongside both younger Japanese and foreign staff. In many countries, these jobs would be filled by foreign workers but Japan lacks a concrete immigration policy has resulted in older citizens staying in employment for longer.
        The facility — which has a waiting list of several hundred — sets their official retirement age at 70, but lets people who want to work do so until 80. The common retirement age in Japan is between 60 and 65, but doctors recently proposed raisingitto 75.
        Despite efforts to encourage more senior citizens to work for longer, 80.5% of companies in Japan still set their official retirement age at 60, according to a 2015 survey conducted by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare.
        In 2013, the government passed a law requiring companies to raise the mandatory retirement age to 65. But full compliance isn’t required until 2025.

        This has created a situation where many companies rehire senior workers at lower salaries once they pass retirement age, according to Atsushi Seike, an economist at Keio University in Japan.
        “There should be more pressure on companies to extend mandatory retirement to 65 as a decline in wages really discourages older workers to continue working,” he said.

        Developing second careers

        Cross Hearts executive director Seiko Adachi told CNN that many of her more senior charges are motivated through their interaction with younger workers and older residents.
        “Growing old is the first step in losing something, whether that be your sibling, your parent, or your role in society … the good thing about elderly carers, is that they really understand how our elderly residents are feeling,” she said.
        “It’s also good preventative care for them as if they feel like they have a place to go, that will keep them going.”
        According to Adachi, the key to engaging more senior employees is by helping them focus on their care-giving job, not as a part-time wage-filler, but as a second career that they can really develop.
        For some, the possibilities appear endless.
        “I want to study for another care-giving license and take on a managerial role later on,” Tasaka said with a grin. “I don’t feel limited by my age.”

        Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/22/asia/japan-nursing-home-old-workers/index.html

        Boots apologises for morning-after pill response – BBC News

        Image copyright Getty Images

        Boots has said it is “truly sorry” for its response to calls to cut the cost of one of its morning-after pills.

        The pharmaceutical company was criticised after telling the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS) it was avoiding “incentivising inappropriate use”.

        It now says it is looking for cheaper alternatives to the Levonelle brand.

        The firm said it “sincerely” apologised for its “poor choice of words” over the emergency contraception pricing.

        The progestogen-based drug Levonelle costs 28.25 in Boots, with a non-branded equivalent priced at 26.75.

        The branded drug costs 13.50 at Tesco and a generic version is 13.49 in Superdrug.

        However, Superdrug charges 27 for Levonelle and 35 for an alternative emergency contraceptive pill, EllaOne.

        European comparison

        BPAS has lobbied Boots to reduce the cost of the pill to make it more accessible for women having difficulty getting the drug quickly on the NHS.

        The service also found the pills can cost up to five times more in the UK than in some parts of Europe.

        Previously, Boots had defended its pricing plan for the pill, saying it was often contacted by individuals who criticise the company for providing the service.

        It also said it “would not want to be accused of incentivising inappropriate use, and provoking complaints, by significantly reducing the price of this product”.

        Image copyright Science Photo Library

        The response led to some Labour MPs saying Boots had taken an “unacceptable” moral position, while health campaigners talked of a “sexist surcharge”.

        The company later issued another statement, stating regret that its previous response had “caused offence and misunderstanding”.

        It added: “The pricing of [emergency hormonal contraception] is determined by the cost of the medicine and the cost of the pharmacy consultation.

        “We are committed to looking at the sourcing of less expensive EHC medicines, for example generics, to enable us to continue to make a privately funded EHC service even more accessible in the future.

        “In addition the NHS EHC service where it is locally commissioned, is provided for free in over 1,700 of our pharmacies, and we continue to urge the NHS to extend this free service more widely.”

        The morning-after pill can be taken in the days after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy.

        In England, Levonelle and EllaOne are free of charge from most sexual health clinics, most GP surgeries and most NHS walk-in centres or urgent care centres, but they are free only to women in certain age groups from pharmacies in some parts of the country.

        In Scotland and Wales, the emergency contraceptive pill is available free of charge on the NHS from pharmacies, GPs and sexual health clinics.

        In Northern Ireland, some pharmacies allow it to be bought on the NHS, and it is available free of charge from sexual health clinics and GPs.

        Read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40689763

        I read about Bannon and Clinton so you don’t have to

        (CNN)“Devil’s Bargain” — Bloomberg Businessweek reporter Joshua Green’s in-depth exploration of the mind and machinations of former Breitbart News boss and Trump chief strategist Steve Bannon — and “Shattered” — a painstaking account of Hillary Clinton’s unsuccessful campaign by Jonathan Allen, also of Bloomberg, and Amie Parnes of The Hill — have both climbed the bestseller lists and monopolized the attention of the chattering classes since their releases. (“Shattered” was published in April; “Devil’s Bargain” hit shelves this past week.)

        They’re both absorbing reading for anyone interested in better understanding the unlikely and unprecedented set of circumstances that put reality show multimillionaire Donald Trump into the White House. Both offer fascinating (and juicy) revelations; neither should be read on its own, since their access journalism roots make each a half-book at best, covering just one of the two campaigns, and always from the perspective of sources whose personal agendas make them eager to talk.
        Here’s my scorecard of how they stack up.

          “Devil’s Bargain:” Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Storming of the Presidency

          Most compelling character:
          Given that the book reads like an odd hagiography of Steve Bannon, it’s impossible for him not to be its most compelling character: Brilliant, slovenly, gleefully opportunistic and given to profane eruptions and weird turns of phrase, proudly referring to Trump supporters as fellow “hobbits” and “grundoons,” and dismissing dumb and useless people as “schmendricks” and “mooks” (ironic, since Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign manager was, of course, Robby Mook). A close second: Robert Mercer, the eccentric right-wing billionaire who backed the Trump insurgency. Prior to backing Donald Trump, Mercer’s primary electoral investment had been in the unsuccessful congressional campaign of a quack scientist with an obsessive fixation on human urine.

            What you need to know about Steve Bannon

          Biggest revelation:
          Bannon conceived of activating the internet’s legions of disaffected, meme-addicted young males after investing (and losing his shirt) in IGE, a Hong Kong-based business that “farmed” gold and virtual items for resale to online gamers. Bannon realized that these underemployed and overeducated denizens of message boards like 4chan and Reddit were susceptible to misogynist and racist symbolism (when disguised with snark) and highly adept in launching viral campaigns. They became the digital shock troops for the booming growth of Breitbart News and, later, the Trump campaign.
          Most memorable quote:
          From Steve Bannon: “(House Speaker Paul Ryan is) a limp-d*** m***rf***er who was born in a petri dish at the Heritage Foundation.”
          Best anecdote:
          All the anecdotes that paint Bannon as larger-than-life even in his own mind, like the one about an oil painting of Bannon reimagined as Napoleon Bonaparte that hangs in his personal office — a gift from British ultranationalist and Brexit proponent Nigel Farage. Or the one about how Bannon recruited a strikeforce of “beautiful young women” to Breitbart News, whom he proudly referred to as his “Valkyries.”
          Best anecdote about Chris Christie:
          According to Green’s sources (or conjecture), Chris Christie’s exile from the Trump inner circle began when he dared to tell The Donald that when Clinton was ready to concede, President Obama would call the governor and Christie would hand his phone to Trump. Trump, a fanatical germophobe, was reportedly repulsed at the thought of having Christie’s mobile against his face and barked back, “Hey, Chris, you know my f***ing number. Just give it to the President. I don’t want your f***ing phone.”
          Key takeaway:
          Steve Bannon is a fascinating and monstrous character, who undoubtedly bears great responsibility for Donald Trump’s shocking victory. But the interesting revelations about Bannon are primarily constrained to the first half of the book, and focused mostly on his rise to power; by the book’s midpoint — when it begins to cover the campaign in earnest — Bannon feels oddly sidelined, and the narrative becomes much more of a by-the-numbers diary of Donald Trump’s slouch toward the Oval Office.

          “shattered:” Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign

            Authors: Hillary Clinton didn’t grasp populism

          Most compelling character:
          Not Hillary Clinton — but that’s by design, as Allen and Parnes’ thesis about the campaign’s failure depends on Clinton’s being framed as simultaneously world-weary and naive, controlling and remote, distracted and obsessive, but most of all, incredibly boring. Bernie Sanders comes off as far more interesting, though he’s also firmly presented as unelectable. Though a minor character, the most memorably described figure in the book comes early: Clinton true-believer Adam Parkhomenko, whose desire to see her elected president was so passionate that it led him to found the scrappy grassroots movement Ready for Hillary and spend a full decade tirelessly fighting to make her POTUS.
          Biggest revelation:
          Hillary Clinton was far closer to picking Elizabeth Warren as her running mate than anyone suspected — in part because they connected so deeply on the girl-wonk level. Would making the surprise pick of the popular — and populist — Warren have turned things around for Clinton? Quite possibly. The roadblock to Warren’s selection? She’d run afoul of President Obama, calling him out for nominating a banker to a key Treasury Department role. “It’s safe to say she’s not a favorite person in this building,” one White House official observed.
          Most memorable quote:
          “When you’re done with a condom, you throw it out.” — unnamed Democratic insider, whom Green describes as “familiar with Mook’s thinking,” discussing Robby Mook’s attitude toward the grass-roots zealots of Ready for Hillary.
          Best anecdote:
          In May 2016, when Hillary Clinton was being pressured to give a high-profile public interview in the face of the rise of Bernie Sanders and the relentless drip-drip-drip story of her private email server, she was asked by her communications chief what journalist she’d most prefer for a one-on-one TV conversation. Her team thought she said “Brianna,” and reached out to CNN’s Brianna Keilar as a result; Clinton had actually said “Bianna,” referring to Bianna Golodryga of Yahoo! News, the wife of former Clinton administration economic aide Peter Orszag. The interview — brutally intense, rather than softball — turned out to be “a disaster” for Clinton.
          Best anecdote about Bernie Sanders:
          Sanders was asked to film a TV ad to seal the deal of his endorsement of Clinton. He was fine with everything that the Clinton campaign asked him to say — putting a stamp of approval on her positions regarding education, health care and the minimum wage — but refused to say the script’s final words, “I’m with her.” “It’s so phony!” he griped. “I don’t want to say that.” He didn’t. The ad ultimately never ran.

          Join us on Twitter and Facebook

          Key takeaway:
          “Shattered” appears to have been written with a key assumption in mind: that Hillary Clinton was almost entirely responsible for her own defeat, and that this defeat was predestined because of her personal history and prior political choices she’d made. That makes it a strangely off-key read in an era where new revelations about Russian interference in the campaign and potential collusion (perhaps the true “devil’s bargain”) are erupting on a daily basis. But it also seems to put a capstone on Clinton’s political career, having her declare to her “Hillaryland” team after her loss that 2016 is the “last campaign” of her life. Fact, or wishful thinking on the part of the authors? We’ll undoubtedly see as the gears of 2020’s campaign begin to grind.

          Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/21/opinions/devils-bargain-shattered-opinion-yang/index.html

          The week in patriarchy: Trump clearly doesn’t understand health insurance

          If you dont realize by now that a total clown is in charge, nothing is going to change that. At least its Friday

          If you want to be able to sleep this weekend, do yourself a favor and dont read the New York Times expansive interview with Donald Trump. The president makes little sense as he answers questions about everything from Russia to Jeff Sessions and healthcare and if you were already worried about whose hands the country is in, this piece will not put your mind at ease. For example, it seems pretty evident that the president of the United States has no idea how health insurance works.

          I used to see interviews like this and be a bit pleased because the more coverage of Trumps stupidity the better. But if you dont realize by now that a total clown is in charge, theres no interview or expose thats going to change that. So join me this week in a good old fashion wallow: things are bad, the president is bad. At least its Friday.

          Glass half full

          Scotland just became the first nation to offer free sanitary products to low-income women. Access to tampons and pads arent just a hygiene issue but a health and rights issue. At least one country is getting it right.

          What Im RTing

          Amir Talai (@AmirTalai)

          I read this brilliance on race and couldnt help thinking the world could really use Fran Lebowitz blogging or tweeting or something. pic.twitter.com/KLTHaZa6op

          July 18, 2017

          Laurie Penny (@PennyRed)

          Most of the interesting women you know are far, far angrier than you’d imagine.

          July 18, 2017

          Renee Bracey Sherman (@RBraceySherman)

          Home care workers care for families, and sometimes deal with abuse, sexual assault, and only get paid $10 an hour. https://t.co/P6oream4xT pic.twitter.com/TNzJJn1HwK

          July 20, 2017

          Planned Parenthood (@PPact)

          .@ppfa & @ReproRights are suing Texas over its latest abortion ban. Politicians make bad doctorshttps://t.co/zRfjG51i5t #WeWontGoBack pic.twitter.com/wmksAUMYmm

          July 20, 2017

          Who Im reading

          Soraya Nadia Mcdonald on R Kelly and the truth behind why he hasnt been held accountable for his abuse we just dont care about black women; Daniel Kibblesmith with a humourous but way too real take on the expectation that Hillary Clinton disappear from public life; and ProPublicas incredible investigation into maternal deaths in the United States.

          What Im watching

          How Fox News is trying to normalize collusion. Oh good.

          How outraged I am

          I was already at a ni ne out of 10 over Betsy Devos listening to anti-women rape deniers, and this first person account at Vox from a sexual assault survivor put me at a full 10.

          How Im making it through this week

          A golden retriever in Long Island rescued a baby deer from drowning and Ive watched it at least 15 times.

          Sign up for Jessica Valentis weekly newsletter on feminism and sexism

          Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jul/21/the-week-in-patriarchy-trump-clearly-doesnt-understand-health-insurance

          Eight former CBO directors defend the agency amid Republican criticism

          (CNN)Eight former directors of the Congressional Budget Office sent a letter to congressional leadership Friday to underscore the agency’s importance and respond to criticism from Republican lawmakers and the White House.

          “We write to express our strong objection to recent attacks on the integrity and professionalism of the agency and on the agency’s role in the legislative process,” the letter said.
          The nonpartisan agency has come under fire in recent months for its analyses of several versions of the Republican House and Senate health care bills.
            Most recently, the CBO estimated Wednesday that the Senate bill to repeal but not replace the Affordable Care Act would leave 32 million more people uninsured by 2026 than under current law. A report Thursday estimated 22 million more would be uninsured under a full repeal and replace bill.
            Republicans have been openly critical of the CBO’s numbers. House Speaker Paul Ryan on Thursday called the CBO’s estimate “bogus” and “not credible.” Marc Short, the White House’s director of legislative affairs, and National Economic Council aide Brian Blase published an op-ed in The Washington Post on Sunday calling the CBO’s methodology “fundamentally flawed.”
            The White House even tweeted a video last week criticizing the CBO for inaccurately estimating ACA enrollment numbers. In May, White House Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney questioned the agency’s very existence, asking the Washington Examiner, “Has the day of the CBO come and gone?”
            According to the signers of the letter to congressional leaders, the answer to Mulvaney’s question is no: The CBO has served the American people well for 42 years, the former directors contend.
            “As the House and Senate consider potential policy changes this year and in the years ahead, we urge you to maintain and respect the Congress’s decades-long reliance on CBO’s estimates in developing and scoring bills,” the letter said.
            Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
            The former directors include a number of scholars and executives of both conservative and liberal leanings: Dan Crippen, former executive director of the National Governors Association; Douglas Elmendorf, dean of the Kennedy school of Government at Harvard University; Douglas Holtz-Eakin, American Action Forum president; June O’Neill, Baruch College economics professor; Peter Orszag, managing director of Lazard; Rudolph Penner, Urban Institute fellow; Robert Reischauer, Urban Institute president emeritus; and Alice Rivlin, Brookings Institution senior fellow.
            Current CBO Director Keith Hall, a former staff economist for President George W. Bush, was chosen by GOP leaders in 2015. He did not sign the letter.
            While the signers acknowledged that not every CBO estimate is accurate, they argued that “such analysis does generate estimates that are more accurate, on average, than estimates or guesses by people who are not objective and not as well informed as CBO’s analysts.”
            The letter comes as McConnell plans to hold at least one vote on a Republican health care plan next week.

            Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/07/21/politics/former-cbo-directors-respond-criticism/index.html