3 Terrifying Pieces Of Anti-Woman Legislation You Need To Know About Right Now

When I mention your body’s biggest enemy, you probably have something that came immediately to mind: your thighs, your arms, the pimple you got from dropping kettle corn into your mouth/all over your face so you could eat without sitting up for normal adult reasons. Or maybe you thought of the parade of fuckboys last few bros you banged who confirmed for you that some people just weren’t built to interact with the female body. This second guess is closer to what I’m actually talking about, because it similarly concerns a group of largely white men (if you’d like to fight me on your sexual history, feel free, I’m just taking a guess) who have no business with women’s bodies, and yet can’t leave them the fuck alone. Those people are called YOUR GOVERNMENT. (Mic drop, I am political.)

In all honesty, I probably don’t have a single friend who would describe me as political; I don’t even feel like I ignore the news on purpose, it just kind of floats past me, like everything that was ever said in a high school history class. But because I’m a selfish bitch I care about my readers very much, when I hear about bullshit new measures that will negatively affect my body both on a daily basis and in times of need, I am going to listen the fuck up and urge you all to do the same. Here’s a rundown of the three scariest pieces of legislation aimed to limit women’s choices right now—and for those of you with any remaining doubts that I really do not usually care/write about politics, please know that I literally just Googled the word “legislation” to make sure I was using it correctly. Feels good.

1. Remember When Obama Made Your Boss Pay for Your Birth Control? Yeah, That’s Over.

In a continued bid to out-evil Satan, Trump made a fun little announcement last Friday: He’s shut down the Obama-era law requiring most employers to cover co-pay-free birth control, an amazing measure we definitely all took completely for granted. Now, in the nation of Gilead Trump’s America, employers will be able to cite “religious or moral objection” to covering birth control, and BAM: You can no longer afford brunch, because that budget has been re-allocated to your “not getting pregnant” fund. Oh, and regardless of your birth control type, this shit is not cheap: My employer insurance had a fun two-week blackout last month and I was charged $200 for a 30-day supply of my GENERIC birth control pill. So don’t even try to come at me with that “just pay out of pocket, mer mer mer, women want everything for free” shit, TYLER.

Proposed Solution: If there is a guy you are regularly having sex with, and your birth control coverage is affected, ask him to pay for half. I know this doesn’t effect change on a policy level, but as a group, can women please stop accepting sole financial responsibility for preventing pregnancy? If the guy you’re fucking starts whining about the cost, just tell him there’s a 100% free alternative: You can stop having sex with him, forever.

2. 20 Weeks Pregnant? Cool, You’re Having a Baby Now.

Though this isn’t yet in immediate effect like the above measure, a bill recently passed through the House of Representatives criminalizing abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Never mind the fact that if our government hates abortions so much, they probably shouldn’t have repealed the access to free birth control, which conveniently yielded lower abortion rates than we had in 1973, when abortion was made legal nation-wide. Never mind the disgustingly insulting title for this bill of “Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act,” which would perhaps have been more aptly titled “Pain-Capable and Very Much Born Adult Woman Punishment Act.” In this case, let’s focus on the fact that one of the bill’s co-sponsors, Tim Murphy of Pennsylvania, was literally texting his mistress to GET AN ABORTION while passing this bill through the House. Everything about this bill (and its relation to less-available birth control) is so alarmingly nonsensical that I’m almost ready to start buying into lizard-person theories. Given the one season I watched of , I feel like “handling” a mistress’ pregnancy is basically a rite of passage for most politicians—so why are they so fucking intent on making sure those abortions need to be illegal and unsafe? It’s definitely not a conspiracy to have more women die during the procedure, rendering them unable to talk about the affair, right? Wait…right?

3. A Special-Edition Coverage Slash For Pre-Pregnant, Pregnant, And Post-Pregnant Women

This bad boy, otherwise known as the Graham-Cassidy bill, is luckily having a lot of trouble getting passed, so there’s chance you won’t actually have to deal with this specifically. Which is good because I JUST spent two hours of my Monday at a Planned Parenthood phone bank defeating this nightmare of a bill that keeps popping back up like a zombie Whack-A-Mole, can I live for one week?? But honestly, every proposed healthcare reform bill this garbage-monster administration has spewed out has been pretty similarly shitty, so expect comparable measures if they manage to get anything through. This particular bill has gone ahead and banned women on Medicaid from visiting Planned Parenthood (straight up, I do not know what Medicaid is, but oh my god just allow women access to appropriate healthcare, our bodies are more complicated than yours and we fucking need it). Also, it’s restricted abortion coverage and maternity care in the same bill, so really (unless you’re a politician’s mistress!), these people would like to ensure that you get pregnant, stay pregnant, and bear the emotional, physical, and financial burden of that pregnancy all on your own. Just like how you got pregnant all on your own, without the help of any second party. Right.

Basically, the only common thread of these new measures is that our government doesn’t give a shit about you or your body. There’s no ideological or economic background that makes any sense, much like when Dean started motorboating D-Lo in the pool, thus jeopardizing his supposed “deep emotional connection” with Kristina, and the lucrative fandom love that could have launched a thousand Instagram sponsorships. So, I encourage you to start thinking about our government the way you think about the fuckboys we deal with on a daily basis: Until they shape the fuck up, we’ll be heavily looking into alternative options. You don’t let fuckboys tell you what to do with your body, so let’s get them out of these government positions where they can literally charge you for going against their dumbass ideas on what your body has access to.

 
 

Read more: http://www.betches.com/3-anti-women-healthcare-legislation

Here Are Your Weekend Horoscopes For October 6-8th

It’s Friday, and you know what that means: It’s the freakin’ weekend. But how should you spend the weekend? Should you spend it sippin’ on Coke and rum, screaming “so what I’m drunk” to anyone who dares question you? Should you spend it asleep? Read your weekend horoscope to find out, and then get drunk anyway because we know that’s what you’re gonna do no matter what the stars say. 

Aries

Work got you down, Aries? Like, more than usual? After a summer of easy living and minimal office hours, it can be hard to get back into the swing of things. But you also don’t want to be that lazy asshole who is very obviously sitting at her desk taking Buzzfeed quizzes all day. What’s a girl to do? Use this weekend to decompress as much as humanly possible. You need to walk into work fresh-faced, bushy-tailed, and ready to do work on Monday, which means Saturday and Sunday need to be as tranquil as humanly possible. In general, make any off time an oasis to motivate yourself to get through the day.

Taurus

You know the saying work hard, play hard, Taurus? Well, it only applies if you keep up both ends of the bargain. Your work has left a little to be desired these past few weeks, which isn’t really being aided by the amount of playing you’re doing. Let this weekend serve as a detox of sorts: Cut the alcohol, maybe start sleeping again, see how a book treats you. You know, fun, peaceful stuff. Feel free to go hard on the partying once you get your work balance back to where it used to be.

Gemini

Things aren’t always going to go your way, Gemini. I know that can be hard to hear, seeing as how you demand almost the exact opposite, but this is going to be a weekend of tough truths. Our advice? Roll with the punches, and supplement with vodka when necessary. If it gets to be too much, just remove yourself from the equation and hide yourself away. There’s no shame in bowing out when you’ve had too much.

Cancer

Your life has been a whirlwind of movement and activity these past few weeks, Cancer, but it’s time to get back into the swing of things. Step one of resuming a normal life: Reconnect with your friends. It’s been long enough that you may have some difficulty recognizing each other, but it’s nothing an extended happy hour can’t fix. Once you’re back with your people and feeling grounded, it’ll be easier to move on to righting the rest of your life.

Leo

This weekend you’ll be presented with the opportunity to widen your circle and interact with some people that you typically wouldn’t. Sure, this sounds like a recipe for disaster on about 100 different levels, but armed with some solid allies and a little alcohol, there’s no harm in moving outside your comfort zone. It’s nice to branch out every once in a while, if anything to remind ourselves why we steadfastly avoid it every other weekend of the year.

Virgo

This is a weekend to take things easy, Virgo. While you’re not necessarily in hot water at the moment, one wrong step could put you into a very precarious situation with more than one person in your life. Your best bet is navigating this weekend carefully, opting to stay under the radar when possible. Things will ease up in the next couple weeks, but it would behoove you to tread lightly until then.

Libra

It’s birthday season, Libra! Congrats on making it to the most important time of the year. Your only job this weekend, and for the next couple weeks tbh, is to be as extra as possible. None of your friends can be mad, because those bitches will do the exact same thing when it’s their turn. Let the “treat yo’self” mentality start this weekend, as if you don’t live the rest of the year in the exact same way.

Scorpio

What’s good, Scorpio? Certainly not your luck. There’s just been something about the start of this month that has truly fucked with you, and you haven’t been able to catch a break all week. The good news: It’ll pass. The bad news: Not before the end of this weekend. We all have off-periods from time to time, it’s nothing to freak out about. But maybe try and avoid any high-stress situations this weekend in the hopes of flying under the radar until things turn around for you.

Sagittarius

Looking for a change, Sagittarius? It’s obvious you’re feeling restless, but the question is what are you trying to accomplish here? Fall is a great time for new starts, so if you’re looking to turn over a new leaf, this would be the perfect weekend to start. Use the next two days to get introspective af. Drink some tea, take some walks, sit on rocks and gaze into the distance. Whatever it takes to get you into decision-making mode, do it. You’re going to be making some big moves, be sure to take it seriously.

Capricorn

It’s time to start taking better care of yourself, Capricorn, in literally every sense of the world. You’ve taken a bit of a tumble off the self-care wagon, and this is the weekend you dive back on. Maybe you want to start eating healthier—spend the next two days recipe researching and meal prepping for the week ahead. Not feeling active enough? Get out there and enjoy the last of this weather before winter hits. Or take a mental health approach and spend your time adjusting your mindset. All that matters is that, come Monday, you feel like you’ve taken a real step to a happier, healthier you.

Aquarius

This is a big weekend for you, Aquarius. Some long-term plans are falling into place and you’re finally making real progress. Congrats! However, we know that you’re doing anything but celebrating. While some would be relieved by this by the idea of moving forward, you’re already knee-deep in analyzing and planning phase two. This weekend, give yourself a bit of a break from coordinating your life and let loose a little. It may be your last chance to blow off some steam for the foreseeable future, so kick back with a bottle of wine and leave the frantic shit for next Monday.

Pisces

October holds some real opportunity for you, Pisces. The planets are aligning for a productive month, but that doesn’t mean you can just sit back and coast. Doesn’t matter how generous Mercury is feeling if you spend the next three weeks on your ass. This weekend, take some time to establish a game plan for the things you want to get after this month. You’ll feel better knowing you’ve put some thought into something other than the season premiere of next week, and you’ll feel empowered Monday knowing you’ve got a plan moving forward.

 

Read more: http://www.betches.com/weekend-horoscopes-10-6-17

Trump clears way for ObamaCare ‘alternatives’ in new executive order, goes around stalled Congress

The White House announced Thursday that President Trump is taking executive action on health care as Congress stalls on efforts to overhaul ObamaCare, calling for a plan that could let employers band together and offer coverage across state lines.

An executive order Trump plans to sign Thursday morning aims to offer “alternatives” to ObamaCare plans and increase competition to bring down costs.

“The time has come to give Americans the freedom to purchase health insurance across state lines, which will create a truly competitive national marketplace that will bring costs way down and provide far better care,” Trump said in a statement.

TRUMP’S HEALTH CARE EXECUTIVE ORDER: WHAT TO KNOW

According to officials, Trump will direct the secretary of labor to consider expanding access to Association Health Plans, which could allow employers to form groups across state lines offering coverage. According to the White House, these plans could offer lower rates.

Those “association health plans” could be shielded from some state and federal insurance requirements. But responding to concerns, the White House said participating employers could not exclude any workers from the plan, or charge more to those in poor health.

The order also calls on other federal agencies to consider expanding coverage in low-cost, short-term insurance plans not subject to ObamaCare rules. 

It’s unlikely to reverse the trend of insurers exiting state markets. About half of U.S. counties will have only one ObamaCare insurer next year, although it appears that no counties will be left without a carrier as was initially feared. 

The move comes after congressional Republicans repeatedly have been unable to pass legislation repealing or reforming the Affordable Care Act, which critics say has led to rising premiums and diminishing coverage options – in some cases forcing consumers to lose their previous plans and doctors. Trump’s executive order could clear the way for cheaper, more bare-bones insurance policies. 

Trump’s order is likely to encounter opposition from medical associations, consumer groups and even insurers — the same coalition that has blocked congressional Republicans. They say it would raise costs for the sick, while the lower-premium coverage for healthy people would come with significant gaps. 

Critics have argued that the plan will ultimately raise costs for the sick while the lower-premium coverage provided to healthy people would come with significant gaps.   

Cori Uccello, a senior health fellow for the American Academy of Actuaries, told Fox News that an issue with AHPs is regulation.

“There’s uncertainty of who is going to have oversight in terms of consumer protection. What redress does a consumer have, appeals processes, those kinds of things,” she said. 

White House domestic policy director Andrew Bremberg told reporters during a conference call Thursday that the executive order is necessary because ObamaCare has caused “costs to skyrocket.”

Bremberg acknowledged Trump’s order could affect tens of millions of Americans and said the administration also intends to take “additional actions” on health care in the months to come. 

The administration is hopeful these actions could be implemented within six months, a senior administration official said, but it could take longer to finalize. 

Fox News’ Kaitlyn Schallhorn and Serafin Gomez and The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2017/10/12/trump-clears-way-for-obamacare-alternatives-in-new-executive-order-goes-around-stalled-congress.html

Share this with anyone who doubts vaccines. The U.K. just eliminated measles.

37 years ago, vaccines drove smallpox into extinction. Polio is about to be on death’s doorstep. Now the U.K. can say it has added one more name to its personal kill list — measles.

According to a new report from the World Health Organization, Denmark, Spain, and the United Kingdom in 2016 successfully eliminated the measles virus.

The secret behind this achievement is something simple: vaccines and herd immunity.

It’s important to note that, as the WHO defines it, “elimination” doesn’t mean “completely wiped out.” There were still about 1,600 cases in the United Kingdom last year.

Instead, the WHO reports, the United Kingdom has “interrupted endemic transmission.” That is to say, enough people are vaccinated that even if someone does catch the virus, it’s effectively impossible for the disease to spread. This phenomenon is commonly referred to as herd immunity, and it didn’t happen overnight.

This is the culmination of a long, steady vaccination campaign.

Vaccination campaigns can sometimes face challenges — inadequate supply, unequal access to health services, and hesitancy or misinformation.

Still, the four countries of the United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland) have managed to reach a 95% measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination rate in children younger than 5 years old.

While measles might sound relatively innocuous, it’s a serious, potentially deadly disease, especially for children. Measles can cause permanent hearing loss, encephalitis, and death. It can also cause babies to be born prematurely if a pregnant woman contracts the disease. Eliminating it is a big achievement.

The United Kingdom is not the first country to achieve this goal. According to the WHO, 42 out of 53 European countries have achieved elimination.

This news shows that with dedicated, sustained efforts, we can chase some of our greatest specters back into the shadows.

There’s still plenty to be done. The U.K. will need to keep up its high vaccination rates and keep the herd immunity strong, or else the disease may gain a foothold once again. But with the vast majority of European countries having now eliminated this disease, measles might soon be marching down the same path as smallpox.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/share-this-with-anyone-who-doubts-vaccines-the-uk-just-eliminated-measles

Portraits of the Las Vegas shooting victims

(CNN)One was a man who died shielding his wife from gunfire on their wedding anniversary. Another was a city of Las Vegas employee who died in his boyfriend’s arms. And two others were a veteran corrections officer and his girlfriend who died on the trip they had planned for weeks.

At least 58 people were killed and nearly 500 others were injured Sunday night, authorities say, when a gunman fired on an outdoor country musical festival from the 32nd floor of a Las Vegas hotel in the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history.
Here are the victims’ stories:

    Andrea Castilla

    Andrea Castilla was holding hands with her sister, Athena, at the music festival when the gunfire erupted, according to a GoFundMe page set up by her family. She was shot in the head.
    Her boyfriend, Derek Miller, Athena and her fiancé, Shane Armstrong, carried Andrea out of the concert venue as bullets continued to rain down, according to the fundraising page. They stopped a passing truck to take her to a hospital, where she died.
    “Her beautiful soul will live on forever,” her father, Gus, wrote on Facebook. “I will think of her every day. … I feel Andrea is now an angel in heaven.”
    In another post, her father added, “I will cry my self to sleep… Daddy misses you.”
    Castilla worked at Sephora in Huntington Beach, California. A company statement said she was “known to her colleagues … for her vibrancy, liveliness, caring and consideration of others.”

    Carrie Parsons

    Carrie Parsons, 31, was “always the life of the party and had the biggest heart,” her aunt Barbara wrote on Facebook.
    “We lost our beautiful niece to a totally senseless act in Las Vegas,” Barbara Parsons wrote. “There really are no words to describe the pain of missing Carrie on our whole family. … Recently engaged, she had her whole life in front of her.”
    A Seattle-area resident, Parsons was at the Las Vegas music festival on a trip with her girlfriends, CNN affiliate KOMO reported.
    “She would always say, ‘live, laugh, love’ and she did that,” her friend Laura Cooper told KOMO.
    Parsons, a lover of country music, had a “vibrant, bubbly personality,” her friend Robbie Walden told CNN affiliate KCPQ.

    Austin Meyer

    Austin Meyer, a Marina, California, resident, was at the concert with his fiancée Dana Getreu to celebrate his 24th birthday, according to CNN affiliate KSBW. They were also celebrating an upcoming anniversary.
    Meyer had recently moved to Reno, Nevada, where he was an automotive student at Truckee Meadows Community College, the school said in a statement.
    “He was a wonderful young man and my future son-in-law,” Getreu’s father, Gary, said in the statement posted on the college’s Facebook page.
    “He loved attending the automotive program at your school and praised it all the time. … The loss and grief his family and mine feel at this time is beyond belief.”
    Mayer hoped to open his own auto repair shop after graduation, according to his sister, Veronica Meyer.
    “He was excited to get married and start a family,” she told KSBW.
    She described her brother as “ambitious, smart, and hard-working,” and said he “always had a smile on his face.”

    Brett Schwanbeck

    Brett Schwanbeck, 61, attended the music festival with his fiancée, Anna Orozco, who survived and told his family he had been fatally shot, according to his niece, Carla Van Hoosen.
    “Brett was a great man that was funny, generous, kind, loving and so full of joy,” Van Hoosen wrote on a GoFundMe page she started for his family’s expenses.
    “He would drive 500 miles to help you if you needed it. He loved his family dearly and cherished lake trips, family gatherings, hunting, camping and spending time with his kids and grandkids.”
    The Bullhead City, Arizona, resident died from his injuries Tuesday at Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center in Las Vegas. The retired truck driver is survived by five siblings, three children and five grandchildren.

    Teresa Nicol Kimura

    Teresa Nicol Kimura, known as Nicol, was at the concert with six friends, said Ryan Miller, pastor at For His Glory Community Church in Fullerton, California.
    Miller was among those friends. He said they all scattered when the shooting started. After the rest of the group reconnected, the friends learned Kimura had died.
    Kimura, 38, of Placentia, California, worked for the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration in Irvine.
    “Nicol’s heart was bigger than most human beings, her spirit was beautiful, her laugh was infectious, and she just had a way of making every time we gathered an awesome one,” Miller wrote on a GoFundMe page he started for her family. “She made you jealous of how much she loved life. And if you didn’t know her, you missed out on a better life than the one you have.”
    Responding to the news, the press office of California Gov. Jerry Brown wrote on Twitter, “Sad to learn @cdtfa employee Teresa Nicol Kimura was a victim of the Las Vegas shooting. We send sincere condolences to family & coworkers.”

    Keri Lynn Galvan

    Keri Lynn Galvan, 31, lived in Thousand Oaks, California. The mother of three was a server at Mastro’s Steakhouse.
    “Her days started and ended with doing everything in her power to be a wonderful mother,” her sister Lindsey Poole wrote on a GoFundMe page created for the family. “She was senselessly murdered on October 1st, 2017 while enjoying a night out with her husband and friends.”
    Tilman Fertitta, chairman and CEO of Landry’s Inc., Mastro’s parent company, said the company is deeply saddened by Galvan’s death.
    “Keri was with our Mastro’s family for almost 10 years and was a valued member of our team,” Fertitta said. “Our condolences go out to her family and all those who knew and cared for Keri. We are raising funds internally to help support her family during this difficult time.”

    Rocio Guillen Rocha

    Rocio Guillen Rocha and her fiancé were in Las Vegas to celebrate a friend’s birthday, and the couple were at the concert when she was shot.
    She was taken to a hospital but didn’t survive, her family said.
    A resident of Anaheim, California, she leaves behind four children, including a son born just weeks ago.
    She was an assistant manager at a California Pizza Kitchen restaurant — and she once struggled through what was once feared to be permanent paralysis, said her eldest son, Marcus Guillen, 18.
    “She was paralyzed having my brother” years ago, Guillen told CNN. “She had a blood clot in her spine. The doctors said she would never walk again. She proved everyone wrong. She was able walk. After that, she ran half marathons.
    “She did everything she could. She always fought for us. I want (people) to remember just how much a fighter she was and how much she worked and how much she provided for us.”
    She is survived by her fiancé, Chris Jaksha, and her children: Marcus; Christopher, 13; Sofia, 1; and a 1-month-old, Austin.

    Patricia ‘Pati’ Mestas

    Patricia “Pati” Mestas, 67, attended the festival with some friends and was near the front of the stage when the shooting began, her cousin Tom Smith said.
    Mestas was a retired gas station, convenience store and deli manager from Menifee, California, and she loved country music, traveling and her family, Smith said.
    “This was the best part of her life,” Smith said, adding she talked of having time now to be with her grandchildren. “I remember the almost constant laughter.”
    Smith recalls spending time with Mestas in March after their last remaining uncle died. He sat next to her at dinner. “It was difficult for life to defeat her,” he said. “I remember her being able to talk about the good things, rather than talk about illnesses, like older people do. She loved to laugh, loved to smile — a big smile that would line up the whole of her face.”
    Mestas leaves two brothers, three children, eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

    Brian Fraser

    Brian Fraser of La Palma, California, attended the festival with about 20 people that included his wife and children. Nick Arellano, the oldest of Fraser’s four children, described him as “the most involved parent.”
    He coached his children’s football and baseball teams and was in the school parents’ association. Arellano was 11 when Fraser married his mother and adopted him. The couple had three other children, who are ages 17, 10 and 4. “He took care of all (of) us,” Arellano said. “Every person he was in contact with saw his love and compassion and honesty.”
    Jason Aldean, the last act of Route 91 Harvest, was Fraser’s favorite country singer. Fraser and his wife were walking toward the stage for his favorite Aldean song, “Dirt Road Anthem” when he was shot, Arellano said. A friend performed CPR on Fraser and loaded him into a wheel barrow to seek medical attention. Doctors and nurses did everything they could, but Fraser died of his injuries. “We don’t know who they are, but we want to thank them,” Arellano said.
    Fraser was vice president of sales at Greenpath Funding. The company released a statement after his death: “Brian Fraser impacted everyone who crossed his path with his infectious positive energy, his tenacious will to succeed, and his willingness to help others.
    “Our hearts are broken, and the Greenpath family will never forget you, Brian.”

    Denise Cohen

    Denise Cohen of Carpinteria, California, was a property manager in Santa Barbara with two children. She attended the concert with her companion, Derrick “Bo” Taylor.
    The couple had been planning the trip for weeks, her friend Leana Orsua told CNN affiliate KEYT. Cohen was planning to volunteer at the California Avocado Festival the following weekend.
    “She was a very active, social person. She touched so many lives. She was a super positive, genuine, kindhearted individual,” Orsua said.
    She said Cohen and Taylor met at a social gathering and quickly became friends, then roommates. Orsua shared a text message with KETY from Cohen’s son, Jeff Rees, remembering his mother.
    “Our mother was such a strong, beautiful and happy woman who made a difference to the lives of everyone she knew,” he wrote. “She was such a happy person and enjoyed doing the things in life that she loved. We can see by the last photo of her that she was indeed happy and with a person that loves her, Bo.”

    Derrick ‘Bo’ Taylor

    Derrick “Bo” Taylor, 56, was a veteran with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
    Taylor joined the department about 30 years ago, rising to the rank of lieutenant. He worked at the Ventura Conservation Camp, which houses up to 110 adult male inmates. The camp helps train inmates to become regional firefighters.
    He attended the concert with his girlfriend, Denise Cohen.
    Taylor’s loss will be felt deeply, Warden Joel Martinez wrote in a memo to staff, according to a department newsletter.
    “There are no words to express the feeling of loss and sadness regarding Bo’s passing. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends,” Martinez wrote.
    In the comments section of the notice on his death, people praised Taylor as a good co-worker and friend. As one person said, “Bo was a great man, as a supervisor he set the bar so high that no one will ever be able to touch it.”

    Kurt von Tillow

    Kurt von Tillow of Cameron Park, California, and his wife Mary Jo were best friends who did everything together. They golfed together and recently brought their two grandchildren to Disneyland. Together, they attended the country musical festival with their daughter and two more relatives.
    Von Tillow’s wife and daughter escaped unharmed. But the 55-year-old truck driver died of his injuries, a relative told CNN. Von Tillow’s sister and niece were hospitalized Monday and are expected to survive, Janet Carson-Tenney said.
    “He lived a perfect life. He was loved by everybody, he didn’t have an enemy, he didn’t have a mean bone in his body. He was the life of the party,” Carson-Tenney told CNN. She’ll remember his laugh and how much he loved his family.

    Jack Beaton

    Jack Beaton of Bakersfield, California, and his wife Laurie were celebrating their 23rd wedding anniversary with friends at the concert.
    He was shot while shielding his wife from the gunfire, CNN affiliate KBAK reported.
    “He never passed up an opportunity to give somebody a hand,” Beaton’s father-in-law Jerry Cook told KBAK. “He always had a smile on his face. He had countless friends. Everybody that came in contact with him loved the guy.”
    Three hours before the shooting, he posted a blurry photo on Facebook of the gang lounging on the lawn, koozie-covered beers in hand.
    The day after the shooting, Beaton’s son shared a picture on Twitter of his father and asked for prayers.
    “He jumped in front of my mom and got shot,” he wrote. “I love you dad.”
    Later, he posted on Facebook: “Lost my best friend. I love you so much more (than) you could ever imagine.”

    John Phippen

    John Phippen, a 56-year-old father of six, was fatally shot while shielding a woman from the gunfire, Phippen’s neighbor said.
    Phippen was hit after his son stopped to help someone else, said Leah Nagyivanyi, Phippen’s neighbor and close friend for 17 years. His son was wounded in the arm, she said.
    Phippen lost his wife three years ago, said Nagyivanyi. Her family went on camping trips with Phippen and his clan. He was the kind of person who got along with both children and adults, she said.
    “Our kids look up to us, and look to us for guidance, but these kids considered John their best friend,” Nagyivani said. “That tells a lot about the kind of person you are. He was everybody’s best friend.”
    One time, when a boat flipped over during a camping trip, Phippen and his son sprang into action just like they did at the concert, she said.
    “He was a man of integrity who always had your back,” she said. “There is nothing he couldn’t do for you, wouldn’t do for you. You didn’t even have to ask.”

    Thomas Day Jr.

    Thomas Day Jr., 54, of Riverside, California, was with his four children at the festival, said Bruce Abbey, a vice president of a California construction company where Day worked.
    His daughter Whitney Day wrote the following about her father:
    “My sisters Candice and Kelsey and brother Nolan and I just want to say that he was our rock, he was our everything. Anyone he came across he put a smile on their face. All our friends would call him Daddy Day because he treated everyone like one of his own and it was an honor to us all to be able to share our dad with the world.”
    Day was an estimator at Portrait Construction in Corona, California, and had been at the company for more than 20 years, Abbey said.

    Austin Davis

    Austin Davis, a pipefitter from Riverside, California, was at the concert with a friend and her family. The friend’s father, Tom Day Jr., was also killed.
    His girlfriend of nine years, Aubree Hennigan, said he loved playing softball. Katelyn Hood, who said Davis was her best friend and her baby’s godfather, described him as a man’s man with a contagious smile.
    “He worked so very hard and took the most pride in that and anything he did. Austin didn’t half-a** anything in life. If he knew you, he loved you. That’s just how he cared for people,” Hood said.
    Davis’ mother, Lori Quick, said he was her everything. In his last text to her, he said, “I kinda want to come home, I love home,” Quick said in a Facebook post.
    “He is coming home not in a way that any parent would want him to. We wanted to bring him home in our arms,” she said.

    Chris Hazencomb

    Chris Hazencomb, 44, was excited to see one of his favorite artists, Jason Aldean, at Route 91 Harvest.
    Hazencomb went to the festival with his friend Nikki Torres. Torres said she and her husband knew Hazencomb for years and considered him part of their family.
    “He was the nicest person I have known. He loved to help people and thought of others before himself,” she told CNN.
    Like many attendees, they thought the first round of gunshots were firecrackers. “After the second or third rounds, we realized that it was bad,” Torres said. “That is when I looked over and he was on the ground.”
    After that, Torres said her memories blur together. She saw a man try to help Hazencomb while others led her away from the scene.
    Hazencomb’s mother told the Ventura County Star that he was a sports a junkie who worked at the Walmart Neighborhood Market in Camarillo, California.

    Laura Shipp

    Laura Shipp, 50, spent two days at the festival with her son, Corey. They were “big concertgoers, especially when it came to country,” a family friend said in an online fund-raiser.
    At some point during the shooting, the two became separated, and Corey Shipp spent the day afterward looking for his mother. By Wednesday, she had been identified, her brother told CNN.
    Shipp, an avid Dodgers fan, moved to Las Vegas about five years ago to be closer to her son, the Ventura County Star reported.
    “She was his world and he was hers,” her brother Steve Shipp told the newspaper.
    Aimee Mack, one of Shipp’s friends, told CNN that they’d been close since they met in the ninth grade, and that Shipp was generous and “was smart as a whip and had a huge heart.”
    “Laura made friends with everyone,” Mack said.

    Victor Link

    Victor Link of Aliso Viejo, California, described himself on his company’s website as a “tequila quality control tester.” He also enjoyed traveling, snowboarding, golfing, cooking and wine tasting with family and friends.
    Andrew Soss said that Link worked for his mortgage originator business.
    “He was the most genuine, stand-up guy you’ll ever meet. He brought a smile to everyone’s face,” Soss said.
    Link was attending the concert with his fiancée and their friends.
    “They came back from a two-week trip from Europe a month ago, and they were traveling and living life,” his nephew Vincent Link told The Bakersfield Californian.

    Christiana Duarte

    Christiana Duarte had recently started working for the Los Angeles Kings after graduating from the University of Arizona in May with a degree in mass communications. The NHL team put out a call for information about her Sunday night.
    “Our organization is overwhelmed with grief over the loss of our colleague Chrissy,” Kings President Luc Robitaille said in a statement. “In just a brief period of time, Chrissy had an immeasurable impact on all of us. We want to make every effort to ensure that everyone knows how special she was and the impact she already had made on so many people.
    She had worked with the Los Angeles Rams as well as the Arizona Diamondbacks. She enjoyed playing intramural soccer, softball and volleyball.
    Her alma mater confirmed her death. The school said it is reaching out to those who knew her, including her Sigma Kappa sorority sisters.
    “All of us in the University of Arizona community are saddened that Christiana Duarte, one of our graduates from this past May, is among the victims from Las Vegas on Sunday night,” President Robert C. Robbins said in a statement. “This attack is a terrible tragedy for hundreds of families, and it is a shocking and horrific event for all of us. I know I speak for the UA community in expressing our deepest condolences to Christiana’s family and in asking for their privacy to be respected.”

    Carly Kreibaum

    Carly Kreibaum’s passion for art lives on in a Sutherland, Iowa, flower shop, where she painted flowers on the storefront. Florist Bonnie Wallinga, owner of The Menagerie, told CNN affiliate KTIV that the married mother of two didn’t have a mean bone in her body.
    Kreibaum’s sister-in-law confirmed that she was among the victims of the mass shooting.

    Brennan Lee Stewart

    Las Vegas native Brennan Lee Stewart shielded his girlfriend and helped others to safety before he was shot dead, his family said in a statement.
    “Brennan was the kind of guy who always put others before himself, including up to the moment he lost his life,” the family said.
    Stewart loved country music, played the guitar and wrote music, his family said.
    Last year he posted to Facebook his cover of the Cole Swindell song “You Should Be Here.” As of Wednesday, the post received more than 134,000 views and more than 1,170 shares.
    “His love for country music was shown through the songs that he wrote, and the music he played on his guitar. Brennan rarely missed an opportunity to attend a country concert,” his family said.

    Dana Gardner

    Dana Gardner of Grand Terrace, California, was the deputy recorder of the San Bernardino County assessor-recorder-clerk’s office.
    “We are devastated and still in shock trying to comprehend what happened last (Sunday) night,” her daughter Kayla Gardner posted to Facebook on Monday. “My family and I appreciate the outpouring of love and support and ask for prayers at this time.”
    Dana Gardner was a county employee for more than two decades and was known for her “can-do” attitude and vibrant energy, said Bob Dutton, San Bernardino County’s assessor-recorder-clerk.
    “Dana will be dearly missed by family, friends, and co-workers. San Bernardino County mourns her loss. We offer our deepest condolences to Dana’s loved ones and to all those impacted by this horrific event,” Dutton said.
    “Our mom was an amazing human being and she stood for everything good in the world,” Gardner’s daughter, Kayla, told CNN. “She had a contagious smile that would light up a room and a sense of humor that would make everyone laugh.”
    “She instilled in us the importance of love and caring for human beings, and was a person with no hate who saw people for their character and always saw the good in them,” she said.

    Cameron Robinson

    Cameron
    Cameron Robinson lived in southwestern Utah but commuted to Las Vegas, where he worked as a legal records specialist, said his sister, Meghan Ervin.
    He was at the concert with his boyfriend, Ervin told CNN affiliate KUTV.

    Dorene Anderson

    Dorene Anderson, 49, of Alaska, was at the concert with her daughters, CNN affiliate KTUU in Anchorage reported.
    The Alaska Housing Finance Corp., which employs her husband, John, confirmed her death.
    Dorene Anderson’s family released this statement through the employer:
    “Due to this horrific and terrible situation, our family is dealing with a great loss. She (Dorene) was the most amazing wife, mother and person this world ever had. We are so grateful and lucky for the time that we did have with her. We are greatly appreciative and want to thank everyone for the thoughts and prayers you have been sending us. We are dealing with the situation as a family, and would appreciate our privacy as we grieve for our loss.”

    Lisa Patterson

    Lisa Patterson, from Los Angeles’ San Pedro community, was a mother of three. She was attending the concert with four friends.
    Patterson was active in church, helped coach in a girls’ softball league and was devoted to her family, said her husband, Robert Patterson.
    After hearing about the shooting, he drove to Las Vegas with his son and eldest daughter on Monday morning but couldn’t immediately find out what happened to his wife.
    A coroner called him Monday evening to tell him she’d passed away. He returned to Los Angeles, where he broke the news of her death to their youngest daughter, who’s 8.
    “I can’t believe she’s gone. … She was such a warm, caring person. There was nobody that cared more about people and life than my wife, Lisa,” Robert Patterson told CNN affiliate KCBS.
    “She was such an amazing person. She cared for so many people,” her eldest daughter, Amber Patterson, told CNN. “She was so enthusiastic. She was literally the best mom, and she was my best friend.”
    Amber said she appreciated hearing people’s fond memories of her mother.
    “When I got my belly button pierced and her going with me … that kind of stuff really is what makes me think of her and makes me happy to remember her,” she said.

    Steve Berger

    Steve Berger of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, was killed in Sunday’s attack, his father told CNN affiliate WTMJ.
    He was celebrating his 44th birthday with friends in Las Vegas, the TV station reported.
    Berger moved to Minnesota about 10 years ago and was a financial adviser for EFS Advisors.
    “Steve was passionate about his work as a financial adviser, and was beloved by his clients,” the company said in a statement. “He cared so much for others and was always willing to take time to listen to clients, friends, and co-workers to offer a helping hand.”
    The father of three children was able to run a successful financial planning business, get his kids to school in the morning and off to soccer practice in the evening, his father, Richard Berger, told CNN affiliate WCCO.
    “He was the greatest father for his three kids that you’d ever want,” the elder Berger told the TV station.

    Bill Wolfe Jr.

    Bill Wolfe Jr. was a youth wrestling coach in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania.
    “It is with the most of broken hearts, the families of Bill Wolfe Jr. and his wife, Robyn, share that Bill has been confirmed to be among the deceased as a result of the mass attack in Las Vegas,” the Shippensburg Police Department said on Facebook.
    Carl Bert, owner of a surveying and engineering firm, told CNN affiliate WPVI that Wolfe had once worked for him as an engineer. Bert described him as personable, fun, easy to work with and a devoted Christian, WPVI reported.

    Jordyn Rivera

    Jordyn Rivera was in her fourth year at California State University, San Bernardino. The university released a statement confirming her death.
    “It is with the utmost sadness I must report that a member of our campus community is among the victims,” university President Tomás Morales said.
    Rivera was warm, optimistic and kind, he said.
    Katie Ortega, who has known Rivera for years, said they played softball together as kids.
    Rivera “was and always will be a role model to many,” Ortega said. “She would always make it a point to make every single individual feel special, always laughing at my stupid jokes.”
    She was passionate about softball.
    “That softball diamond was her heaven,” Ortega said.

    Heather Warino Alvarado

    Heather Alvarado, 35, was a mother of three and married to Albert Alvarado, a firefighter in Cedar City, Utah. The couple loved traveling with their three children.
    “She always saw the good in others. She spent her whole life serving others in her family and community,” the Cedar City Fire Department said in a Facebook post.
    “She was happiest when she was together with her family, especially her children and she would do anything for them.”
    “They appreciate your many words of kindness and concern,” the post said.

    Candice Bowers

    Candice Bowers was a single mother of three. Her family described her as a superhero who loved country music.
    “It was a gift that she was able to spend her final moments doing what she loved with those she loved even more,” her family said.
    “Her strength, fierce loyalty and memory will live on through their lives and those of her family and friends who loved her so dearly.”
    Her children included a recently adopted 2-year-old, her family said in a statement.

    Adrian Murfitt

    Adrian Murfitt, 35, was a commercial fisherman from Alaska.
    Murfitt had surprised his friend with a weekend trip to Las Vegas when the shooting happened. His friend Brian MacKinnon held him in his lap as he passed away from gunshot wounds.
    His mother, Avonna Murfitt, told CNN that her son was jolly and caring.
    ʺEvery one of his friends was his best friend,ʺ she said. ʺHe will be missed by all who knew him, and most of all by me.ʺ
    The outpouring of love has been amazing, Avonna Murfitt said.
    “We are humbled by the way everyone who knew him has offered assistance to help in bringing him home and celebrating his life,” she said.

    Kelsey Meadows

    Kelsey Meadows, 28, was a substitute teacher in California’s Taft Union High School District.
    Meadows graduated from Taft Union High School in 2007 and later earned a bachelor’s degree from Fresno State University. She returned to the Taft community, where she had worked as a regular substitute teacher with the district since 2012, the district said in a statement.
    Taft Union High School Principal Mary Alice Finn said Meadows was “smart, compassionate and kind.”
    “She had a sweet spirit and a love for children,” Finn said. “Words cannot adequately capture the sorrow felt by her students, colleagues and friends in learning of her passing.”

    Melissa Ramirez

    Melissa Ramirez graduated from California State University Bakersfield in 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in business administration.
    Flags at the school were lowered on Monday in honor of Ramirez and the other victims and will remain so through sunset on Friday, the school said in a statement.
    “We are terribly saddened to learn that we lost a member of our CSUB family in this senseless act of violence. Our entire CSUB campus community is heartbroken, and we send our deepest sympathies to Melissa Ramirez’s family and friends,” the school said.

    Rachael Parker

    Rachael Parker was a 33-year-old records technician for the police department in Manhattan Beach, California. She also had eyes on higher education.
    Parker earned her bachelor’s degree in social work from Colorado State University in June 2016, Manhattan Beach Police Department said. She was in the process of applying to graduate school, police said.
    She worked for nearly a decade at the front desk of the police station. Even in those stressful confines, she was known for her “cheerful and compassionate demeanor,” police said.
    “Rachael’s smile could light up a room, even on the most difficult of days.”
    She had a particular passion for working with older adults. She completed her undergraduate practicum by working with Manhattan Beach’s Older Adults Program.
    She loved her two adopted dogs, Maddie and Izzy. She enjoyed baking, country music and Los Angeles Kings hockey, police said.
    “Rachael, we love you and we miss you. Our hearts are breaking,” police wrote. “Please keep Rachael’s family and friends in your thoughts during this difficult time.”
    She was one of four off-duty Manhattan Beach police employees who attended the Vegas concert. She died at the hospital. Another police employee, a sworn officer, was shot and suffered minor injuries, the department said.

    Jordan McIldoon

    Jordan McIldoon, a 25-year-old from Maple Ridge, British Columbia, died holding the hand of a stranger at the concert.
    Heather Gooze told CNN she somehow ended up next to McIldoon. Even though she didn’t know him, she held his hand during his final minutes. She felt a squeeze from his fingers, then felt his hand go loose.
    Gooze said she knew there was nothing more to do. Yet, she stayed with McIldoon for hours. When his phone rang, she answered it and learned his name and told the caller everything was not OK.
    She relayed the news of his death to his long-term girlfriend and his mother, all the while staying by his side, she said.
    “I didn’t want Jordan to not have somebody with him,” she told CNN through tears. “I didn’t want him to just be a no-named body. I knew who he was, and now I had an obligation to make sure that everyone knew who he was.”
    McIldoon’s mother told Gooze he was a good, nice and fun person.
    “He loved his girlfriend and had great family and great friends,” Gooze told CNN.

    Christopher Roybal

    Christopher Roybal, 28, was a general manager at a Crunch gym in North Colorado Springs, Colorado. He was known there for his “big teddy bear smile and infectious laughter,” said David Harman, managing partner at Crunch.
    “More than a team member, we lost someone who was a son, mentor, friend and hero, as a Navy veteran who served in Afghanistan,” Harman said.
    Ryan Chiaverini, Roybal’s former brother-in-law, told CNN that Roybal was attending the concert with his mother to celebrate his 29th birthday. He had a really good sense of humor and had a “fun, sweet, innocent way about him,” Chiaverini said.
    In a Facebook post from July, Roybal poignantly reflected on what it’s like being shot at from his time overseas.
    “My response has always been the same, not one filled with a sense of pride or ego, but an answer filled with truth and genuine fear/anger,” he wrote.
    He said his first fight was something he’d never forget. He felt sensory overload and extreme adrenaline, making him “excited, angry and manic.” But as the fights continued, the excitement faded, leaving just the anger, he wrote.
    “What’s it like to be shot at? It’s a nightmare no amount of drugs, no amount of therapy and no amount of drunk talks with your war veteran buddies will ever be able to escape,” he wrote. “Cheers boys.”

    Hannah Ahlers

    Brian Ahlers told CNN his wife of 17 years was “shot in the head while dancing” with him at the music festival.
    Hannah Ahlers, 34, was a stay-at-home mom of three who had lived in Beaumont, California, for the last five years, but was originally from Redlands.
    “She was a full-time house wife and mommy and she was amazing at it,” he said. “Very active in moms groups and our daughter’s volleyball team. She wasn’t too good for anybody. Beautiful inside and out.”
    Ryan Chiaverini, who was friends with Ahlers, told CNN that “she couldn’t hurt a fly.”
    “She was one of the kindest people I’ve met,” he said.

    Stacee Etcheber

    Stacee
    The San Francisco Police Officers Association confirmed Tuesday that Stacee Etcheber was killed in the attack.
    Etcheber attended the concert with her husband, Vinnie Etcheber, a San Francisco police officer who was off-duty. When the shooting began, Vinnie Etcheber told his wife to run as he began to render aid to those wounded, the police union said in a statement.
    “With heavy hearts, we’ve learned that Stacee Etcheber has passed away. Stacee was a wonderful, caring wife, mother, and daughter. She will be terribly missed,” union President Martin Halloran said in a statement.
    “Our deepest condolences go out to the entire Etcheber family and our thoughts and prayers are with all those who lost a loved one during this tragic attack.”

    Denise Salmon Burditus

    Denise Salmon Burditus, 50, was a retired banking professional who had just returned to college.She was the former president of the Association of the US Army subchapter in Lacey, Washington, according to NorthwestMilitary.com.
    She and her husband, Tony, were in Las Vegas enjoying a weekend away from their West Virginia home.
    The couple, who were married for 32 years, posted pictures on social media of themselves lounging by the pool and having dinner with friends. About 30 minutes before the shooting, Denise Burditus posted a picture of the two standing in front of the Route 91 Harvest stage.
    The couple were dancing together when the gunfire started and continued through the first burst of gunfire, not sure what it was. During the second burst, Tony Burditus said he was leading his wife through the crowd when a bullet hit her.
    A stranger helped him move her, and someone rode with them to a hospital in the back of a truck. Tony Burditus said his wife died in his arms.
    “It saddens me to say that I lost my wife of 32 years, a mother of two, soon to be grandmother of 5 this evening in the Las Vegas Shooting,” he wrote on Facebook. “Denise passed in my arms. I LOVE YOU BABE.”

    Charleston Hartfield

    Charleston Hartfield was many things: a Las Vegas police officer, an accomplished Nevada Army National Guard sergeant first class and a youth football coach.
    But beyond those titles, he “epitomizes everything good about America,” said Brig. Gen. Zachary Doser, commander of the Nevada National Guard.
    Hartfield was off-duty and attending the Route 91 Harvest concert when he was shot and killed, the Guard said in a statement.
    Though just 34, Hartfield wrote a memoir titled “Memoirs of a Public Servant,” which documented the “thoughts, feelings, and interactions of one Police Officer in the busiest and brightest city in the world, Las Vegas.”
    “Charleston Hartfield lived to serve the public and protect his family,” Brig. Gen. William Burks, the adjutant general of the Nevada National Guard, said. “He is the epitome of a citizen-soldier.”
    Hartfield — or “Coach Chucky,” as some called him — was also a coach for the Henderson Cowboys youth football program, the group said on Facebook.
    “Coach Hartfield touched many lives both on and off the field. He was a great man who we all lost way (too) early,” the program said.
    Stan King, the father of one of the players on the team, said he was “an absolute all-American kind of guy.”
    “He is one of the nicest guys I know and helped countless youth become winners through NYS football here in Henderson, Nevada,” King said. “This kind of guy comes around once in a blue moon. He was a very special guy to the community.”

    Angela Gomez

    Angela “Angie” Gomez was a “fun-loving, sweet young lady with a great sense of humor” who loved the stage, the Riverside Unified School District said in a statement.
    Gomez attended Riverside Polytechnic High School in California and was a member of the class of 2015. She acted on stage with the Riverside Children’s Theater, was involved in the middle and high school choir, and was a cheerleader for the high school, the school district said.
    She challenged herself academically with honors and Advanced Placement courses, the school district said. And she “was always seen with a smile on her face whenever she was on campus.”
    “Angie was a loyal friend who loved her family and will be forever missed by all those who knew her,” the district said.
    Her English teacher and cheer coach Lupe Avila said the school was “deeply saddened by the loss of a wonderful young woman who had her whole life ahead of her.”

    Sonny Melton

    Sonny Melton, 29, a registered nurse from Tennessee, was shot and killed in the attack Sunday night, according to the Henry County Medical Center in Paris, Tennessee, where he worked.
    His wife, Heather Melton, an orthopedic surgeon at Innovative Orthopedics, survived the mass shooting, the statement reads.

    “I Wanna Get Out Of Here.” Vet Has Gut-Wrenching Reunion With Family In Puerto Rico

    Since Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico on September 20, it has caused widespread devastation on the island.

    Thought it’s been two weeks since the nearly Category 5 hurricane hit, residents of the U.S. territory are still suffering and desperate for help. U.S. Marine veteran Mario Salazar has family in Puerto Rico and decided to take matters into his own hands when he received a brief and desperate call from them.

    Yesterday, the governor of Puerto Rico updated the death toll to 34.

    In some towns, officials reported that 80 to 90 percent of their structures had been destroyed. The storm also knocked out power to the entire island, and it still hasn’t been restored for about 95 percent of its citizens.

    No power means no clean water for many on the island. Others have been struggling to find food as well.

    Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/puerto-rico-devastation/

    Here Are Your Weekly Horoscopes For The Week Of October 9th

    Well, we survived a full moon last week and Mercury isn’t in retrograde or any shit like that this week, so unless you’re due for some sort of monster period or something, your week should be pretty smooth sailing no matter what sign you’re under. Something to note: Jupiter moves into Scorpio this week, which is great news for the water signs—Cancer, Scorpio and Pisces. Jupiter will stay there for, like, a year, so if you’ve been needing some good luck, this is your time to capitalize.

    Aries

    Jupiter mobilizing this week is actually excellent news for you because it’s entering one of your most important houses: your money house. Since Jupiter posts up here for the next 12 months, this is your best year to go for that big job, promotion, or to make that big purchase. Big purchase as in an apartment, not like, a Birkin. I mean, get the bag if you want, but don’t expect it to really benefit your life in a major way.

    Taurus

    Jupiter slides out of your DMs this week. Wait, is it possible to slide out of someone’s DMs or only into them? IDK, but what I’m trying to say is Jupiter is directly opposite your sign starting this week. Jupiter not only controls what goes on with your money, but the planet is also tied to happiness or some shit. You would think it being opposite your sign would be a bad thing, but you’d be wrong in assuming that. The next year is one of prosperity and joy for you. You’re welcome.

    Gemini

    While most betches are trading bikinis for sweatpants this time of year, you’re actually going to be more focused on your fitness and overall health starting now-ish. Like, thanks Jupiter. Your fitness kick with actually help improve other aspects of your life. You know, because endorphins make you happy and happy people just don’t shoot their husbands. With more focus and energy, you’ll feel more fulfilled at work or with however you’ve chosen to spend your life. Overall, this is an excellent time for you to start working toward some results.

    Cancer

    Jupiter in Scorpio is, like, the total best for you. Just buckle the fuck up for a great year ahead, really. You’ve been grinding away for what seems like forever, and now that you’ve set up a really strong and decent foundation for yourself, it’s definitely time to reap those blessings. The year ahead promises adventure, romance, and travel opportunities. Things have felt kinda heavy in your life, but the next year is all about lightening the hell up and enjoying the shit out of being a Cancer betch.

    Leo

    Your life always works better when you work your sign and the planets instead of against them. Normally, you’d scoff at the idea of settling down and letting your nesting instincts kick in, but like, this might actually be a really good year for you to start digging some roots in. It’s important you start laying some foundations for where you want to end up in life, or at least entertaining those kinds of thoughts. By no means do you need to get serious AF and get married and pop out a bunch of babies. Fuck that. No, just like, think about your dream future and work toward that.

    Virgo

    Let’s be real, Virgo, you are prone to some negative self-talk. It’s probably because you’re a really analytical and intelligent sign, so you’re more apt to contemplate and think deeply about your life choices—that can often mean you’re really critical of others and yourself, though. The next year is all about a more positive outlook. Like, no, you don’t have to start wearing a color that isn’t black. You’ll just be a little easier on yourself and a little more joyful from within. Ain’t nothing wrong with that.

    Libra

    Not that you’ve ever had a hard time spending money on yourself, but with Jupiter entering your Earnings House, you’ll be more likely to invest in bigger ticket items. Say goodbye to Forever 21 polyester and hello to some J. Crew cotton blends! Over the next 12 months, you’ll be more likely to afford the finer things in life as money-making potential abounds. No more scrimping and saving every last penny so you can look like you have it made; this is the year where you’ll actually have it made. Nice.

    Scorpio

    Obvi, the sign that benefits the most from Jupiter entering Scorpio is, well, Scorpio. Duh. In case you didn’t already know, you’re a water sign, and this next year is one where your fluidity in all situations will benefit you greatly. You’ll fit in in just about every situation as your ability to adapt will be at an all-time high. Also, you’ll just be overall more likable because everyone else can tell how #blessed you are during the next year and they want some of your luck to rub off on them. Beware of fake friends who want to just bask in your glow and not be a true ride or die.

    Sagittarius

    You’re the investigator of the zodiac, meaning if someone is lying or being shady, you’re most likely to find out. You’ve had some questions about something in your life and over the next 12 months, you’ll finally get your fucking answers. While you might be losing trust in one aspect of your life, you’ll be gaining some faith and understanding in another. Don’t go out and buy a bunch of crystals or some other bullshit; you’ll have all the clarity you need on your own.

    Capricorn

    Jupiter is making you increasingly popular in the next year. Sure, normally you’re pretty social and have a tight-knit group of friends, but basically everyone you meet is going to want to be bffs with you this year. Don’t shun anyone new who wants to hang out with you; you’re actually looking at a window where new friendships will be mutually beneficial. Like, they get to hang out with you and you get to use whatever connections they have to offer. Of course, you can’t just use people for their cool party invites. C’mon, be a good person. It’s like, the rules of feminism.

    Aquarius

    Jupiter travels right across the top of your chart like “YASSS BETCH”. Sort of like what happens when the Sun is at the top of your chart, when Jupiter is above you, you experience a big bump in the eyes of others. Anyone in a position of authority is more likely to see you through rose-colored glasses. Expect awards, compliments, promotions and maybe a few new romantic suitors in the year ahead. Life is not bad for the Aquarius betch this year.

    Pisces

    Jupiter means knowledge, power, wealth and happiness. In the next year, you’re building toward big awards and accolades. You’ll be #blessed, like all the other water signs, with the power of Jupiter ruling over you over the next 12 months. This of the next year as a time to, unfortunately, keep working hard. But the good news is you’re setting yourself up for one of the most successful years of your life: 2019. Big things are in store for you, Pisces betch! 

    Read more: http://www.betches.com/weekly-horoscopes-10-9-17

    These Suburbanites May Have No Fracking Choice

    When Bill Young peers out the window of his $700,000 home in Broomfield, Colo., he drinks in a panoramic view of the Rocky Mountains. Starting next year, he may also glimpse one of the 99 drilling rigs that Extraction Oil & Gas Inc. wants to use to get at the oil beneath his home.

    There’s little that Young and his neighbors can do about the horizontal drilling. Residents of the Wildgrass neighborhood own their patches of paradise, but they don’t control what’s under them. An obscure Colorado law allows whole neighborhoods to be forced into leasing the minerals beneath their properties as long as one person in the area consents. The practice, called forced pooling, has been instrumental in developing oil and gas resources in Denver’s rapidly growing suburbs. It’s law in other states, too, but Colorado’s is the most favorable to drilling.

    Now fracking is coming to an upscale suburb, and the prospect of the Wildgrass homeowners being made by state law to do something they don’t want to do has turned many of them into lawyered-up resisters. “It floors me that a private entity could take my property,” says Young, an information security director.

    Many states require 51 percent of owners in a drilling area to consent before the others have to join. Pennsylvania doesn’t allow forced pooling at all in the Marcellus, one of the most prolific shale gas regions in the country. Texas, the center of the nation’s oil production, has strict limits on the practice. Despite its founding cowboy ethos of rugged individualism, Colorado has one of the lowest thresholds. “There’s a tension in oil and gas law between allowing private property owners to develop their mineral estates on their own and the state’s desire to ensure that ultimate recovery of oil and gas is maximized,” says Bret Wells, a law professor at the University of Houston.

    The rise of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing over the past decade has ushered in a modest oil boom on Colorado’s Front Range by enabling companies to wring crude more cheaply from the stubborn shale that runs beneath Denver’s northern suburbs. From 2010 to 2015, Colorado’s crude output almost quadrupled. This year the state is pumping more than 300,000 barrels a day, most of it from the Wattenberg oil field beneath Wildgrass and beyond.

    Colorado’s population is booming, too. As Denver’s suburbs bloom northward into oil and gas territory—Wildgrass is about 20 miles north of Denver, not far from Boulder—housing developments are erupting where once there were only drilling rigs and farmland. And because horizontal drilling can reach as far as 2 miles in all directions from a well, companies need underground access to more land to maximize production from each site. The Colorado Oil & Gas Conservation Commission issues hundreds of pooling orders every year. “It’s an entirely new issue,” says David Neslin, former director of the commission, now an attorney at Davis Graham & Stubbs in Denver. “That’s creating some understandable friction with local governments and local communities.”

    Denver-based Extraction Oil & Gas is at the epicenter of that friction. Although it has rural holdings, a substantial amount of its reserves are located in populated areas. So the company, like others in the region, has put a lot of energy—and cash—into making its operations more palatable to suburbanites who fear the prospect of a drilling rig sprouting up within sight of their kiddie pools. Extraction almost exclusively uses electric drills, which are quieter than diesel-powered, and a new generation of hydraulic fracturing equipment that cuts noise. “It’s incumbent upon us to learn to live with these communities,” says Extraction spokesman Brian Cain. “Where we can go the extra mile to minimize impacts, we wish to do so.”

    The company’s latest project involves drilling 99 horizontal wells in Broomfield. That means leasing mineral rights from Wildgrass residents. Letters went out to some of them last year offering a 15 percent royalty and a $500 signing bonus. Some signed, others demurred, and still others organized a campaign aimed at blocking the project. Extraction hasn’t applied for a forced pooling order, but Young and his neighbors have come to believe it’s inevitable.

    The suburb’s agitation prompted the city to create a special task force to evaluate Extraction’s proposal. The company responded by taking members of the task force on a tour of oil and gas country. It wanted to show how its operations are less disruptive than traditional drill sites.

    Ultimately, the company agreed to more stringent environmental standards than the state requires. It will move some wells 1,300 feet from neighborhoods, almost three times farther than the law mandates. It will reduce the number of wells per site, monitor air emissions as well as water and soil quality, and build pipelines to transport oil immediately off-site instead of storing it in the city. “I can see Broomfield turning out to be a new model for how large-scale development gets done,” says Matt Lepore, director of the state commission, which will rule on Extraction’s applications for siting the wells this month.

    Such concessions have smoothed the path for development in many communities. But for some Wildgrass residents, any leasing is unacceptable. They say they fear accidents, such as the April pipeline explosion that killed two people and destroyed a home in Firestone, 20 miles away. Some simply find the terms of the initial lease offer laughable.

    “The money is so negligible,” says Elizabeth Lario, a health coach who’s lived in Wildgrass since 2005. And then there are property values: Homes in Wildgrass range from $500,000 to more than $1 million. “The royalties won’t offset the drop in property value,” says Stephen Uhlhorn, an engineer who’s lived in Wildgrass for four years. Oil development “is now hitting affluent neighborhoods where people have assets and livelihoods that exceed the value of any royalty they’re offered.”

    The bedrock of Colorado’s oil and gas policy is a 1951 law that says responsible fossil fuel development is in the public interest. The state, the law says, must protect the public from “waste”—industry parlance for oil that’s left in the ground. While Colorado has some of the strictest environmental regulations of any oil-producing state, it gives companies latitude in choosing where to drill. The Colorado Supreme Court has repeatedly held that the state’s interest in developing mineral resources preempts any local law that would curb drilling.

    Efforts to change the statute have fizzled. State Representative Mike Foote, a Democrat whose district is adjacent to Broomfield’s, introduced a bill earlier this year to raise the pooling threshold to 51 percent. It passed the House by a slim margin but died in a Senate committee in a party-line vote, with Republicans opposed. “The oil and gas industry pretty much controls the capital, particularly in the Senate,” Foote says. “Operators can do whatever they want.” Lepore, the head of the state oil commission, concedes the pooling threshold is low compared with other states. “I have no philosophical objection to a 51 percent requirement,” he says. “There are intelligent changes that could be made to the forced pooling law.”

    Young, the Wildgrass resident, received a lease offer last year. Since then he’s been working with a lawyer to consider his options, and so far he doesn’t like them. “You couldn’t put a Walmart where they’re putting these wells—no one would approve that zoning,” he says. “But for some reason, the industry is completely exempt from everything.”

      BOTTOM LINE – In Colorado, whole neighborhoods may have to lease the minerals under their land if just one homeowner agrees.

      Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-10-03/these-suburbanites-may-have-no-fracking-choice

      Hugh Hefner Death Certificate Reveals ‘Highly Resistant’ E. Coli And More

      We knew

      The e. coli was specifically described in the report as “highly resistant to antibiotics.” This was likely the infection we heard about from a couple years ago which began his downward turn.

      E. coli infection can be caused by consuming raw or undercooked food, contaminated water, or even close contact with a person who is infected.

      Unfortunately, the M.E. could not determine the source of Hef’s infection.

      [Image via DJDM/WENN.]

      Read more: http://perezhilton.com/2017-10-03-hugh-hefner-cause-of-death-certificate-e-coli-septicemia-cardiac-arrest

      Scottish government backs fracking ban

      Image copyright Getty Images
      Image caption The decision has drawn praise from environmental groups but criticism from industry

      The Scottish government has announced an “effective ban” on fracking.

      Energy Minister Paul Wheelhouse told MSPs that the practice “cannot and will not take place in Scotland”.

      He said an existing moratorium on the technique, which has been in place since 2015, would continue “indefinitely” after a consultation showed “overwhelming” opposition.

      The government will seek Holyrood’s endorsement for the ban in a vote following the October recess.

      But with only the Conservatives now opposed to a ban, the vote is likely to be a formality.

      The move was welcomed by environmental groups but has been slammed by Ineos, operators of the huge Grangemouth petrochemical plant, which holds fracking exploration licences across 700 square miles of the country.

      The Scottish government has previously imposed a similar block on underground coal gasification (UCG) – a separate technique used to extract gas from coal seams deep underground – on environmental grounds.

      It followed the introduction of a moratorium on both fracking and UCG in 2015, which saw a series of expert reports published on the potential health, environmental and economic impact of the controversial techniques, as well as a public consultation being carried out.

      Mr Wheelhouse said the consultation came back with “overwhelming” opposition to fracking, with 99% of the 60,000 respondents supporting a ban. He said this showed that “there is no social licence for unconventional oil and gas to be taken forward at this time”.

      Image caption Paul Wheelhouse said there was overwhelming public opposition to fracking

      The move comes almost exactly a year on from the UK government giving the go-ahead to horizontal fracking in Lancashire.

      Shale gas is currently processed in Scotland at a site in Grangemouth, having been shipped in from abroad, but cannot be extracted from beneath Scottish soil under the current moratorium, which is enforced through planning regulations.

      Mr Wheelhouse said local authorities would be instructed to continue this moratorium “indefinitely” – calling this “action sufficient to effectively ban the development of unconventional oil and gas extraction in Scotland”.

      He said: “The decision I am announcing today means that fracking cannot and will not take place in Scotland.”

      Mr Wheelhouse’s announcement was welcomed by environmental groups, with Friends of the Earth Scotland and WWF Scotland both hailing a victory for campaigners.

      WWF Scotland official Sam Gardner said it was “excellent news”, saying “the climate science is clear” that fossil fuels should be “left in the ground”.

      Mary Church from Friends of the Earth Scotland said it was a “huge win for the anti-fracking movement” which would be “warmly welcomed across the country and around the world”.

      ‘Poor decision’

      However Ineos said the move could see “large numbers of Scottish workers leaving the country to find work”.

      Tom Pickering, operations director of Ineos Shale, said: “It is a sad day for those of us who believe in evidence-led decision making. The Scottish government has turned its back on a potential manufacturing and jobs renaissance and lessened Scottish academia’s place in the world by ignoring its findings.”

      Ken Cronin of UK Onshore Oil and Gas also said it was a “poor decision”, which ignored “extensive independent research” and was “based on dogma not evidence or geopolitical reality”.

      And the GMB Scotland trade union said the move was “mired in dishonesty” and “an abandonment of the national interest”, saying Scotland would now be dependent on gas shipped in from “the likes of Qatar and Russia”.

      Image copyright BBC Sport
      Image caption The first shipment of shale gas from the US arrived at Grangemouth in September 2016

      The Scottish Conservatives also said Scotland would miss out on a “much needed economic boost” and high-skilled jobs as a result of the decision.

      Tory MSP Dean Lockhart said ministers had ignored scientific and economic evidence to take a “short-sighted and economically damaging decision which is nothing more than a bid to appease the green elements of the pro-independence movement”.

      However Labour MSP Claudia Beamish said the move did not go far enough, arguing that ministers were merely extending the existing moratorium which “could be overturned at any point at the whim of a minister”.

      ‘Legally shaky’

      Ms Beamish has a member’s bill tabled at Holyrood calling for a “full legal ban”, but Mr Wheelhouse said this would not be needed until his proposals.

      The Scottish Greens said the announcement was “a step in the right direction”. However, they also wanted a more permanent ban, with MSP Mark Ruskell saying the moratorium was “legally shaky” and open to challenge.

      This was also echoed by Friends of the Earth Scotland, with Ms Church saying ministers should “go further than relying on planning powers” and “instead commit to passing a law to ban the fracking industry for good”.

      Scottish Lib Dem MSP Liam McArthur welcomed the decision, saying that ministers had taken the “scenic route” but had ultimately decided “effectively to ban fracking”.

      MSPs have previously voted to support a ban on fracking, but SNP members abstained from that vote.


      What is fracking and why is it controversial?

      Image copyright Getty Images
      • Fracking is the process of drilling down into the earth before a high-pressure water mixture is directed at the rock to release the gas inside.
      • The extensive use of fracking in the US, where it has revolutionised the energy industry, has prompted environmental concerns.
      • The first is that fracking uses huge amounts of water that must be transported to the fracking site, at significant environmental cost.
      • The second is the worry that potentially carcinogenic chemicals used may escape and contaminate groundwater around the fracking site.
      • But the industry suggests fracking of shale gas could contribute significantly to the UK’s future energy needs

      Find out more….

      Read more: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-41484153