There is currently no emoji to represent periods. This campaign wants to change that.

Image: plan international 

There’s an emoji for just about everything, from tacos to tropical fish. But, we currently don’t have an emoji to describe our periods.

A new social media campaign wants to smash the stigma surrounding menstruation one emoji at a time.

Girls rights group, Plan International, launched a social media campaign on Sunday to include an official “period emoji” on the global emoji keyboard.

The charity has created five designs and people can vote for their favourite emoji. The winning design will be submitted to the Unicode Consortium, the governing organisation that standardises characters across devices.

Image: plan international

The emoji designs include a sanitary towel, a diagram of a uterus, a pair of period pants, a calendar and blood droplets.

Susanne Legena, Deputy CEO for Plan International in Australia says emoji is a global language and it makes sense to campaign for a way to visualise periods that can be used across cultures.

“Even though at least 800 million women and girls between the ages of 15 and 49 are menstruating right now, there isnt a single emoji to represent periods. Isnt it ridiculous that theres a long nose goblin emoji and a floppy disc emoji, but no period emoji?” says Legena.

Legena says the organisation wants people to do something about it by voting for their favourite period emoji design so they can submit it to the official Unicode body.

To vote for your favourite period emoji, visit the
Plan Australia Facebook page.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/05/27/period-emoji-campaign/

Tips for dealing with a toddler and also Donald Trump

President Donald Trump speaks during a news conference with Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos.
Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

Donald Trump is a man whose behavior follows the whim of his impulses and tantrums, much like a toddler, and the world is scrambling to accommodate it.

Officials in the White House and from governments around the globe have tailored aspects of governance to the new president to fit his notoriously short attention span and need for praise.

While most toddlers don’t have access to the nuclear codes, the advice for dealing with the president can also work for your kids at home.

Please keep your speeches really brief

Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

The president’s attention span is not known for being long, and NATO officials are telling leaders around the globe to tighten their speeches to 2-4 minutes, lest the president’s mind wander, according to Foreign Policy.

Make sure you tell him how well he’s doing

hahaha

Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

As president, Trump is often briefed on matters of national security. But Trump doesn’t much like to read, so National Security Council folks have had to take creative approaches to getting Trump to finish their briefings.

Something they’ve found that works? Mentioning his name in “as many paragraphs as we can,” one source told Reuters.

Remember, he doesn’t understand some things

Image: Peter Brooker/REX/Shutterstock

White House officials have tried many times and in many different ways to defend the president’s disclosure of classified information to Russian politicians during a meeting at the White House earlier this month.

What several of them did not say publicly but did anonymously tell The New York Times is that Trump couldn’t have divulged the ways and means of the U.S. intelligence-gathering processes because the president never bothered to learn them.

Just keep him happy with ice cream

Image: andrew Gombert/EPA/REX/Shutterstock

When desert is some pie with a side of ice cream, everyone gets a single scoop. Unless you’re the president, in which case you get twice as many scoops.

Remember, if the worst capitulation you agree to is ice cream, you’re probably doing fine.

Speak soothingly

Image: Jim Cole/AP/REX/Shutterstock

When Trump is upset, he has his friends speak soothing sounds to him over the phone. Those friends include Fox News Executive Chairman Rupert Murdoch, Fox News anchor Sean Hannity, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, and a few billionaires. Richer friends/parents than a toddler is likely to have, but you get the idea.

Bonus: Truck photos

Remember that time Trump hopped inside a truck and smushed his face “into an excited scream” for the cameras?

Trump gets in the driver’s seat of an 18-wheeler while meeting with truck drivers and trucking CEOs.

Image: jim LO SCALZO/EPA/REX/Shutterstock

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/05/20/donald-trump-toddler/

How to protect yourself when live video shows a suicide

Image: Shutterstock / Pressmaster

The thrill of social media is often the possibility of surprise. It’s fun to log on and see which viral videos, political rants, news stories, and baby pictures your friends and family have shared.

What we don’t expect is to see someone die. Watching a suicide attempt (or murder) in real time is not part of the bargain we’ve made to stay connected with the world. And yet it happens. Earlier this week, a Thai man killed his infant daughter and himself on Facebook Live. The video appeared on both Facebook and YouTube before being taken down by the companies.

While such incidents are rare, even news coverage of them can make us feel sad or angry. For some people, learning explicit details about these tragedies may lead to suicidal thoughts or behavior. We know this from years of research, but the phenomenon of broadcasting suicide via live video is so new that even experts in suicide prevention are grappling with how to understand its emotional impact.

“This whole medium has not existed long enough for us to have a good understanding of how it might be different from what you might see in the newspaper or on a TV show,” says Victor Schwartz, chief medical officer of The Jed Foundation, a suicide prevention nonprofit.

“Theres nothing more lurid than seeing something like this in real time.”

He suspects, however, that witnessing a suicide on social media can be as bad or even worse for our emotional health as encountering graphic details in the media: “Theres nothing more lurid than seeing something like this in real time.”

That violence could be overwhelming and deeply disturbing, particularly for people who are at risk for or already experience anxiety or depression, or are struggling with their own suicidal impulses.

To ease that anguish, Schwartz recommends first walking away from its source. “If you were eating or drinking something that tasted [bad], you would stop,” he says. “This is the same thing we cant control what [we see] online, but you can spit it out.”

Once you’ve got some distance, find ways to make that space bigger. Try talking to a supportive, trusted friend about the emotions you felt after watching or hearing about the suicide. Sit down with a TV show that makes you laugh, take a walk or run, or do something else that gives you joy. Essentially, says Schwartz, find ways to distract yourself.

Taking action is important too. If you see a suicide attempt take place on a social media platform, report it to the company. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, and Snapchat all provide users a way to report suicidal behavior or content, and Schwartz says following those guidelines can make someone feel less helpless. (If someone appears to be in immediate danger, you can also contact local law enforcement or 911.) Finally, he urges people experiencing relentless despair or suicidal thoughts to discuss their feelings, seek profession help, or call or text a hotline.

Testing how suicide on live video affects people would be unethical, which is partly why we don’t know its consequences for our emotional health. Yet Madelyn Gould, a professor of epidemiology in psychiatry at Columbia University who specializes in suicide prevention research, believes the existing evidence on the “contagion effect” of suicide is robust enough to suggest that it could harm certain people.

Most of these studies look retrospectively at whether the suicide rate spikes after a high-profile incident and show there appears to be some association between media reports and increases in the suicide rate. Those most affected are likely to be emotionally vulnerable people who can identify with the person who died. So geography, gender, age, and other factors can make a difference in how someone perceives the death, whether it relates to their own life, and how it could influence their frame of mind.

Gould is less worried that we lack research on the impact of seeing a suicide on live video and more concerned that the norms around suicide may be changing to the point where people see it as a widespread, acceptable outcome.

Talking about suicide requires a careful balance of acknowledging how and why it happens while avoiding making it seem inevitable, glamorous, or the best solution to ending one’s pain. That’s why she and other prevention experts were so alarmed by the vivid portrayal of suicide in the Netflix show 13 Reasons Why, in which the main female character meticulously plans her suicide almost as a means of revenge against those who bullied and assaulted her.

“Its ok to talk about your fears or concerns about what youve seen or felt.”

Gould, among other advocates, wants to focus more time on encouraging healthy conversations about self-harm, including coping strategies, how to get help, and spreading the knowledge that many people who have suicidal thoughts or attempt suicide can still lead happy lives.

These are all things to focus on the next time a suicide airs live on social media. And don’t be afraid to express what it meant to encounter that imagery or reporting or to listen to someone else trying to make sense of that.

“Its O.K. to talk about your fears or concerns about what youve seen or felt,” says Schwartz.

If you want to talk to someone or are experiencing suicidal thoughts, text the Crisis Text Lineat 741-741 or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. Here is a listof international resources.

WATCH: Break free from social media with this minimal phone

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/04/30/dealing-with-emotions-of-live-video-suicide/

William and Harry talk to Kate about the impact of their mum’s death

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry have spoken candidly about the impact of Princess Diana’s death on the their mental health in a new film as part of their Heads Together campaign to end mental health stigma.

In the film above streamed on Facebook Live on the Royal Family’s account the three royals talk about the various pressures they’ve experienced in life, and the importance of speaking openly about mental health.

Prince Harry says he thinks people who’ve experienced loss at a young age should talk about it sooner, rather than bottling it up.

“We’ve never really talked about losing a mum at such a young age,” he says to William. “When you speak to other people’s families, you think, wow I don’t want them to have to go through the same thing.”

William says that over the years he and his brother haven’t talked enough about their mother. WHile Harry adds that thinking in that way can be really damaging. “I always thought to myself, what’s the point in bringing up something that’s only gonna make you sad? It ain’t gonna change it. It ain’t gonna bring her back,” he says.

Kate says she thinks it’s “incredible” how strong the two princes are, and how they’ve been able to cope. “I put that down to your really early years, childhood experience. But, also the relationship you’ve got. You’re amazingly close,” said Kate.

“We have been brought closer because of the circumstances as well,” agrees William.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/04/21/prince-william-harry-mums-death/

The Queen is 91 and to mark it the Royal Family are tweeting lovely old photos

Image: Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images

Turning 91 years old is certainly something to be celebrated no matter who you are.

Queen Elizabeth II is 91 today and to mark the occasion, the Royal Family is tweeting black and white photographs of Elizabeth at special moments in her life.

If you visit the Royal Family’s official Twitter account today you’ll be showered with animated balloons in celebration of her big day.

One of the photos the Royal Family have shared shows the Queen at the tender age of one month old at her christening, with her parents, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (The Queen Mother).

A photo of Princess Elizabeth on her 21st birthday was also shared via the Royal Family’s official Twitter account.

@ClarenceHouse the official Twitter account for Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall shared a touching photo of the Queen in 1952 with a 4-year-old Prince Charles.

The Royal Family also shared a photo of the Queen on the phone, pointing out that she was born on the same year as the first ever transatlantic phone call.

@KensingtonRoyal the official Twitter account for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry also tweeted a photo of the Queen and Prince Philip in an open top car, with the younger generation of royals in a car behind her.

Happy birthday Your Majesty!

WATCH: Lady Gaga FaceTimed with Prince William to discuss a very important issue

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/04/21/queen-elizabeth-91-birthday/

6 reasons you need to watch this British dating show immediately

Looking for love is far from easy. Sometimes it can feel like you’re doing it all wrong. But one British reality dating show is bringing joy, laughter, and even the odd tear, to viewers by showing the more human side to first dates.

Set in a restaurant in the heart of London, Channel 4’s First Dates allows viewers to eavesdrop on real-life blind dates.

Of course, there’s crippling nerves, wardrobe malfunctions, excruciating silences and table manner slip-ups. But, it’s so much more than just a spectacle of hilarious encounters.

With each date featured on the show (now in its eighth season) you hear people’s backstories, and you find out why, for some people, going on a date is a huge milestone.

If you’re a dater who’s had more than your fair share of bad dates, First Dates will reassure you that you’re far from alone. If you’re coupled up, First Dates will give you a cheeky glimpse into other people’s love lives. And, if you’re a sucker for romantic stories, this show will undoubtedly move you to tears.

Here are just a few of the reasons you need to watch this cult hit immediately.

1. You’ll see that first-date nerves are very common

Not a single episode of First Dates goes by without someone admitting that they feel very, very nervous. One recurring dater on the show was named “Nervous Louis” because his first date was derailed by his crippling nerves. But, Louis persevered and he came back on the show for a date with someone new, and spoiler alert it went really well! The pair agreed to see each other again. Hurrah!

2. You’ll see proof that first dates can lead to very happy endings

When a date goes really well on First Dates, it’s truly a pleasure to watch. From the moment they connect, you’re rooting for them. You want them to go out again and maybe, just maybe stay together forever.

And, the wonderful thing is: that actually happens on the show. When Ibiba and Aarron share a lovely date together on the show, they talk about some very real feelings about their pasts. And, they later return to announce that they’re having their first baby together!

When Scott and Victoria met on the show, they hit it off straight away. After 3 weeks they moved in together. They returned to First Dates for another special moment.

Awwwwww!

3. You’ll hear people’s life stories and it will probably make you cry

First Dates is a show about dating at all stages of life. Some daters have tragically lost their previous partners, and many share their stories and their reasons for re-entering the world of dating. These stories are profoundly touching, and a reminder that dating is far from easy at any stage in life.

Octogenarians Patricia and Alan shared the many troubles they had faced during their lifetimes, adding that they want to live life to the full. Widower Alan talked about losing his wife and his son, and it’s safe to say his story had people reaching for their tissues.

“Life is so bloody short and so many people don’t realise that. I don’t want to die with any regrets,” said Alan. “I love life.”

Some people on the show talk about the impact of past heartbreaks. On one very emotional date, Damian opened up to his date Kai about developing Tourettes after a very bad breakup, which impacted on his mental health. Kai then revealed that he has been living with depression for much of his adult life.

“I was in love and I took that breakup really hard. I just didn’t think that I could cope. It was at that time that the tics started,” he said.

4. You’ll see that other people get stood up too

The course of true love doesn’t always run smoothly. And sometimes people don’t show up to dates. First Dates has had its fair share of no-shows over the seasons. But, every single deserted dater has had another bite at the cherry. As they say, second time’s a charm.

5. You’ll see that it really is a very small world

For many of us, the idea of going on a date with an ex-partner is not entirely our idea of a good time. But, a couple of times on the show, daters have been accidentally reunited with blasts from their past. In one episode, Vince and Anna shared a date and both mention that they feel like they’ve met before. Turns out they dated when they were teenagers…

6. You’ll see that embarrassing moments are all part of the charm of dating

There are heaps of awkward moments on the show, and they only serve to make the daters even more endearing to their dates.

First Dates is a lesson to us all: even when we’re making fools of ourselves, we’re still lovable. Most importantly of all, the show teaches us that dating can be hard for just about everyone.

But, just like the First Dates daters, there could be a happy ending right around the corner.

WATCH: 20 British sex terms to you can totally use in America

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/04/20/first-dates-british-dating-show/