Soon, you’ll be able to save tweets for later

Image: Richard Drew/AP/REX/Shutterstock

Twitter, the social network that redefined the term “information overload,” is working on a feature that’ll make it easier to bookmark those cool tweets that deserve a second look. 

Announced by several key Twitter employees, including product VP Keith Coleman, the new feature could be called “save for later.”

According to Coleman, this has been a “top request,” and Twitter wants user feedback before they push out a final version of the feature. 

And Associate Product Manager at Twitter, Jesar Shah, has implied that the feature might first become available in Japan. 

As she pointed out, there are roundabout ways to bookmark a tweet — for example, you can DM it to yourself, like it or retweet it. But a dedicated “save for later” button is probably a better option than cluttering your direct messages and likes. 

Shah also shared an “early prototype” of the feature in a short video (below), but said the final version of the feature is “likely to change.” In her example, the feature is simply called “Bookmarks.”

We’ve pinged Twitter about details on this new feature, and will update this post when we hear from them. 

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/10/10/twitter-save-for-later/

Get 75% off Samsung’s truly wireless, fitness-tracking headphones

They can even store up to 1000 songs.
Image: SAmsung

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission.

Awesome deal alert! The Gear IconX wireless smart headphones from Samsung are being slashed from $200 to $50 — if you don’t wanna do the math that’s 75 percent off

The IconX headphones are Samsung’s truly wireless, fitness-tracking in-ear headphones with touch-reactive controls. Conveniently, they come in a box that doubles as both charger and carrying case, and since both the wing and ear-tip are adjustable they’ll fit snugly in pretty much everyone’s ear. 

Regardless of whether your phone has a headphone jack or not (*cough* Apple *cough*) wireless headphones are ideal for the gym, running in the great outdoors or otherwise staying active. For android users, if you sync to the S Health app these little guys will also track your speed, distance, and heart rate while you work out. 

No distractions.

Image: Samsung

You actually don’t even have to have your phone on you to use the IconX headphones. They have 4GB of internal memory, so you can load up your favorite workout playlists, leave your phone in your locker and hit the treadmills. The surface of the earbuds is touch reactive, allowing you to switch songs, change the volume, and answer calls (when connected to your phone via Bluetooth.)

Mashable’s tech reporter Raymond Wong tested these headphones out back when they were first introduced in June of 2016. He was impressed with the straightforward and intuitive touch controls and thought the sound quality was good, though he wasn’t able to workout with them. He also noted that they fit comfortably in his self-professed “small ears.”

With all of these features, the Gear IconX headphones originally retailed for $200. At $50, this is now a steal. This deal only lasts as long until supplies run out, so don’t miss your chance to take 75 percent off these comfy, truly wireless earbuds. With three colors to choose from (black, blue and white), you’re sure to find a pair that fits your style.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/29/samsung-headphones-sale/

The iPhone 8 might cost up to $1,200

The iPhone 8 (or Edition or X, take your pick) could weigh down your bank account.
Image: loris ravera/mashable

Apple is finally slated to reveal the highly-anticipated deluxe anniversary iPhone on Sept. 12, and you will want to buy it immediately — but the sticker price could wind up dampening your excitement for the phone’s next-gen features. 

Rumors claim the iPhone 8 (or Edition or X, depending on who you trust) will be much more expensive than any of its predecessors, pushing the starting cost up to at least the $1,000 mark. That means the top-of-the-line model will cost a whopping $1,200, for anyone who wants more than just the basic level of storage on their deluxe device. 

Leaker Benjamin Geskin tweeted out a pricing tier for the new iPhones, citing information from a friend who has a friend at Apple. 

The sourcing sounds sketchy, but Geskin is far from the first to suggest that the next iPhone will cost more than $1,000. Apple insider John Gruber suggested the deluxe new device would debut at the price point back in July, speculating that Apple could justify the cost by showcasing next-level tech that will be common in future iPhones in a premium device today. 

A New York Times report also backed the idea of a starting price “around $999,” for the iPhone, citing anonymous sources who had been briefed on the device. That’s a much more reliable report than just the whispers of friend of a friend — but others aren’t so convinced that Apple will ask such a high price for a phone.

UBS analysts Steven Milunovich and Benjamim Wilson wrote in an investors note that they “questioned the logic” of Apple putting such a premium on an iPhone. They claim instead that the company will roll out the deluxe device at a $900 starting point for a 64GB model, with a 256GB version eclipsing the $1,000 mark. 

The analysts also noted that Apple typically takes some cues from its competitors, and with Samsung’s latest offerings starting well under $1,000 — the new Galaxy Note 8 starts at $930 unlocked — there’s little incentive for Apple to set the bar any higher.   

None of these projections questioned the features expected in the deluxe iPhone, which include a new edge-to-edge OLED display, a nearly bezel-free screen with no home button, and a new sensor system for facial recognition. 

Speculation over the price of the iPhone is nothing new for the rumor cycle, with reports flying about the extra costs for as long as there have been rumors about a new OLED screen. Now that we’re a week away from the big reveal, however, those projected costs are all the more pressing, since we’re finally closer to getting a shot to put down the cash for one of our own.  

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/05/iphone-8-price-tier-rumors-/

Everything we expect to see at Apple’s big iPhone 8 reveal

Image: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Apple’s next iPhones are almost here.

We’re just days away from what will be Apple’s most anticipated reveal in recent memory. On Tuesday morning, CEO Tim Cook will take the stage at the company’s Steve Jobs Theatre in Cupertino and show off three new iPhones. 

We’ll also get our first look at the next Apple Watch, Apple TV, and hear the latest updates on iOS and macOS High Sierra.

Beyond that, the event carries special meaning for Apple. Not only is it the company’s first public event in the theatre named for its storied founder, it’s also the 10-year anniversary of the original iPhone launch. Given that extra significance, we could be in for a tribute to that original launch or to Jobs himself. 

iPhone 8 or iPhone Edition?

There’s no question this is Apple’s most anticipated iPhone yet. The company’s been trying to keep its exact details under wraps, so of course we have a pretty solid idea of what it’s going to look like, thanks to a never-ending stream of leaks and rumors.

Physically, it’s expected to be about the same size as an iPhone 7, but with an edge-to-edge OLED display that’s bigger than what is currently on the iPhone 7 Plus. It won’t have a home button or Touch ID, and will likely use some kind of facial recognition tech to unlock.

A mockup of a new ‘copper gold’ color Apple is rumored to be introducing for the iPhone 8.

Image: mashable/raymond wong

Wireless and rapid-charging will be supported, and it will have dual rear-facing cameras — likely equipped with a depth sensor to better enable all those new augmented reality apps. It will probably come in a new color and cost at least $1,000, maybe much more

One thing we still aren’t sure of, though, is the name. 

Though most people, us included, have been calling it the iPhone 8, there’s a good chance Apple will eschew its typical naming conventions given that this phone marks the tenth anniversary of the original iPhone. iPhone X, iPhone Edition, and iPhone Pro have all been posited. 

As we get closer to the reveal, iPhone Edition is looking more and more likely but, as with so many Apple rumors, it’s hard to say with any certainty (my favorite dark horse candidate is still, simply, iPhone.) 

iPhone 7S + iPhone 7S Plus

Again, we can’t be sure of the name as some reports have indicated the iPhone 7’s immediate successor will be called “iPhone 8.” Regardless of what it’s called, this pair of phones will be much closer to the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus.

The iPhone 7S and 7S Plus are expected to look much like the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus .

Image: Aflo/REX/Shutterstock

The displays will likely be the same as the iPhone 7 line — no edge-to-edge display here. Though it’d be tempting to think of these phones as the compromise buy compared with the third ultra-premium iPhone, there will be some noticeable improvements.

The 7S and 7S Plus are expected to ship with the same rapid and wireless charging as the iPhone 8, but other than that it’s unlikely to be a major departure from the iPhone 7. It will have an LCD display, a home button, dual rear-facing cameras, and a starting price similar to that of the iPhone 7. 

It probably won’t come in any new colors, and may not even be available with a rose gold or jet black finish.

Apple Watch Series 3

While the three new iPhones will likely hog much of the spotlight on Tuesday, there’s other new hardware to look forward to, including what is likely a new Apple Watch. While it’s not usually the company’s sexiest product, Series 3 sounds like it’s set to be a big revamp.

Series 3 sounds like it’s set to be a big revamp

Most significantly, Apple is expected to add LTE connectivity to its wearable, marking the first time the Apple Watch can truly be independent of your iPhone. This could also have big implications for its fitness-tracking abilities, which we learned more about when Men’s Health visited Apple’s testing lab.

Apple will launch watchOS 4 alongside its new wearable, and it features a new mode for high intensity interval training. The new OS will even be able to connect directly to some types of gym equipment. 

On the outside, the new Apple Watch could have a new screen design, if Apple-watcher John Gruber’s sources are to be believed (Gruber himself says he “wouldn’t bet the house” on the rumor, so, grain of salt). But if turns out to be correct, it’d be the first major redesign since Apple first launched its watch in 2015.

4K Apple TV

As if a new Apple Watch and three-piece set of iPhones isn’t enough, we’re also due for a new Apple TV. Here, it’s not the design of the set-top box that has us excited (though expect it to at least be slimmer and speedier than the current 4th gen model released back in 2015).

The latest box will finally add support for 4K and HDR content. Given that there’s more 4K content available than ever (and HDR is slowly gaining ground), this will be a very welcome (and, frankly, overdue) update.

macOS High Sierra and iOS 11

Apple’s fall launch isn’t all about the hardware. MacOS High Sierra, which comes with a nicely revamped Photos app and a ton of under-the-hood improvements, will likely make its official debut.

Likewise, it looks like iOS 11 will finally be ready for everyone. We know most of what’s in the update, thanks to months of beta builds, but there are still a few unknowns. Apple has yet to reveal the specifics of its P2P messaging service for its Messages app, beyond what we briefly saw on the WWDC stage. 

Apple’s new P2P payments feature for Messages.

Image: apple

And while we we’ve seen a lot of ARKit-enabled augmented reality apps, there’s still a lot we haven’t heard about yet. Exactly how the new iPhone cameras will enhance iOS’ augmented reality features is also unclear. 

As always with Apple, nothing is certain until Tim Cook steps onto that stage. A few surprises are always on the table. Check back this Tuesday for Mashable’s live coverage from Cupertino.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/09/09/apple-iphone-8-event-what-to-expect/

Why youll probably want the next Apple Watch

The next version of the Apple Watch could be a game changer.
Image: Getty Images

Apple is getting ready to launch a new version of the Apple Watch that doesn’t need to be paired with an iPhone in order to work, according to Bloomberg. The report, published earlier this month, claims the next version of the watch will include an LTE chip for internet connectivity and suggests the watch’s square casing may receive a radical new design.

If true, the next-generation Apple Watch’s features could make it the first truly must-have wearable product, finally offering people the right balance of connectivity, usefulness, and fashion credibility that they’ve been asking for.

The Watch wasn’t a breakout success initially, but over time, Apple has correctly adjusted to consumer sentiment and found a great niche for the product. The first iteration was marketed as a general smartwatch for everyone, but as excitement for the shiny new Apple product wore off, the company pivoted to emphasize health and fitness features, like a built-in GPS and water resistance. That shift led to stronger sales that appeared to put Apple atop the entire wearables market.

The third soon-to-be-released version of the Watch will likely continue this health and fitness focus that much was clear from the preview of watchOS 4 we saw at WWDC earlier this year. But it could also make the Watch even more useful for everyone in their everyday lives, making it a must-have for all of us in the iEcosystem.

Connectivity, everywhere

The most exciting rumor about the next-generation Apple Watch is, without question, standalone internet connectivity. Many market analysts believe that the addition of LTE connections will finally convince consumers that wearables are worth their time (and more importantly, money), giving them the ability to use their devices as more than a glorified extension of their smartphone. The feature could be the key for the market’s growth as it enters a “new phase,” in which sales are projected to double by 2021.

The new Apple Watch won’t be the first smartwatch to have standalone internet connectivity, however; the Samsung Gear 3 offered a mass-market 4G LTE-connected smartwatch and was launched last year.

But introducing LTE connectivity to the best-selling device on the market from the most visible company in the world will instantly bring the feature to a wider audience, letting Apple play off its image as an innovator even if Samsung was there first. This happens with the iPhone nearly every product cycle, and the gigantic base of Apple fans eat it up. There’s little reason to believe the Watch would be much different.

There are some concerns about how functional Apple’s standalone wearable could be in its first iteration. Screen size, battery life, and memory are already concerns for such a small device adding LTE chips and giving it even more processing power could make those problems even worse.

The Watch won’t ever be used for major tasks, though. It’s more likely to be used when production is secondary, like, say, when wearers’ hands are otherwise occupied. Runners and other exercisers will be relieved to ditch their phones and retain the ability to send texts, download apps, and stream music online. And a more general audience will be interested in boosting productivity, like when they first started using an iPhone.

LTE-connection will make the Watch all the more attractive to those of us who can’t spend a moment without being connected, which is one of the most important requirements of a gadget these days.

A fresh new look

The rumored new form factor for the Watch shouldn’t be taken lightly as a majorly attractive feature that could make it a must-have device. There’s even a rumor that Apple could introduce microLED screen technology with the new Watch, which could make it even brighter and better looking than the current OLED setup.

Smartwatches have previously fallen in the middle of a strange space between fashion and function, but the scales could be tipping toward looks as a potential determining factor for general consumers. Android Wear devices from major tech companies have largely struggled since the OS was updated earlier this year but fashion companies haven’t been deterred from using the platform, since their customers are worried about looks first, performance second.

If Apple, a famously design-centric company, begins to really treat its Watch like the fashion plate it has the potential to be, its general appeal could go through the roof as hypebeasts and fashionistas lust after the new form factor.

That type of sentiment doesn’t apply to most gadgets, where one generation replaces the last because it works better but in fashion, where aesthetics are the most important quality, consumers can justify buying a new model on looks alone. There’s more of an incentive to upgrade to the new redesigned Watch to go along with your Series 2 for Apple fans, too, giving them an opportunity collect them all and cycle between looks.

Some might be leery of Apple’s movement toward a fitness and fashion focused wearable (Mashable tech editor Pete Pachal chief among them), but the company will find a more receptive general audience by crafting a sexy, always-connected Watch.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/08/14/apple-watch-3-must-have/

Let this fitness tracker motivate you to get moving

Just to let you know, if you buy something featured here, Mashable might earn an affiliate commission.

Theres nothing better than being in shape. It prolongs your life, it makes you feel better, and it can even boost your mood. Unfortunately, its really hard to get in shape, and even harder to maintain it.

Luckily, there are some great fitness trackers that can help you achieve your goals like the Moov Now Personal Coach & Workout Tracker. This award-winning tracker actively monitors your bodys motion to ensure that you get the most out of every workout. It even gives you personalized feedback to correct your form and help minimize your risk of injury.

But what really separates Moov Now from the competition is its coaching. Moov Now features a real-time audio coach that gives you positive feedback throughout your workout so youre always pumped to conquer that next hill or set a new personal record. Its the perfect training tool for high-intensity workouts like circuit training, running, cycling, swimming, and cardio boxing.

Moov Now also shows you how to work in proper intervals so you can recover safely, gain results faster, and gradually level up to more intensive workouts. Plus, it constantly changes your workouts so you stay motivated and dont plateau.

With a tracker like this, its much more likely that you’ll actually get your butt off the couch.Moov Now normally costs $79.95, but you can get it for just $49.95, a savings of 37 percent. Buy it here.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/29/a-fitness-tracker-thats-also-a-personal-trainer/

TrueFace.AI is here to catch the facial recognition tricksters

TrueFace.AI knows if it's looking at a real face or just a photo of one.
Image: ian waldie/Getty Images

Facial recognition technology is more prevalent than ever before. It’s being used to identify people in airports, put a stop to child sex trafficking, and shame jaywalkers.

But the technology isn’t perfect. One major flaw: It sometimes can’t tell the difference between a living person’s face and a photo of that person held up in front of a scanner.

TrueFace.AI facial recognition is trying to fix that flaw. Launched on Product Hunt in June, it’s meant to detect “picture attacks.”

The company originally created Chui in 2014 to work with customized smart homes. Then they realized clients were using it more for security purposes, and TrueFace.AI was born.

Shaun Moore, one of the creators of TrueFace.AI, gave us some more insight into the technology.

“We saw an opportunity to expand our reach further and support use cases from ATM identity verification to access control for data centers,” said Moore. “The only way we could reach scale across industries would be by stripping out the core tech and building a platform that allows anyone to use the technology we developed.”

“We knew we had to focus on spoof detection and how we could lower false positives.”

TrueFace.AI can detect when a face or multiple faces are present in a frame and get 68 raw points for facial recognition. But its more unique feature is spoof detection, which can tell real faces from photos.

“While working on our hardware, we tested and used every major facial recognition provider. We believe that doing that (testing every solution available) and applying facial recognition to a very hard use case, like access control and the smart home, allowed us to make a better, more applicable solution,” said Moore. “All of these steps led us to understand how we could effectively deploy technology like ours in a commercial environment.”

They made their final product by using deep learning. They trained classifiers with thousands of attack examples they collected over the years, and liked the results.

A “freemium” package is available to encourage the development community that helped TrueFace.AI come up with a solution. Beyond that, the Startup Package is $99 per month while the Scale Package is $199 per month. An Enterprise Plan is available via a custom agreement with TrueFace.AI.

While Moore couldn’t divulge exactly which companies are using the technology, he did say some of them are in the banking, telecommunications, and health care industries.

It’s a service that could become increasingly valuable as companies turn to facial recognition technology.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/07/trueface-ai-facial-recognition-photo-attack-detection/

North Korean hackers blamed for worldwide WannaCry cyberattack

Image: mashable

North Korean hackers are allegedly behind the widespread ransomware attack that hit the UK’s National Health Service, affecting computers and hospitals and doctors’ offices last month, according to the BBC.

The hackers belong to a group known as Lazarus, who is believed to have targeted Sony Pictures in 2014 as it planned to release the movie The Interview.

They used a ransomware program called WannaCry which hit multiple countries across the globe, locking up computers and ransoming access in exchange for large Bitcoin payments.

The NHS wasn’t specifically targeted in the attack and the attack affected organisations from across a range of sectors.

The claim that the ransomware attack originated from North Korea was originally made in May by Google security researcher Neel Mehta, who posted a cryptic set of characters on Twitter together with the hashtag #WannaCryptAttribution.

Kaspersky Lab researchers explained that Mehta has posted two similar code samples, one from an early version of WannaCry, and one originating from Lazarus.

Mehta allegedly found evidence that a variant of WannaCry shares code with the 2015 version of Cantopee, a backdoor used by Lazarus Group.

Moreover, WannaCry’s code contained a kill switch a way to stop the malware from spreading indicating that whoever is behind the attack is not (purely) financially motivated.

Another cybersecurity expert, Adrian Nish, who leads the cyber threat intelligence team at BAE, also noticed the overlap with previous code developed by Lazarus.

“It seems to tie back to the same code-base and the same authors,” Nish told the BBC. “The code-overlaps are significant.”

Lazarus Group is highly sophisticated and very active, according to Kaspersky, who in a blog post called the scale of the group’s operation “shocking”.

Britain’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), who is part of the GCHQ, led the international investigation.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/16/wannacry-ransomware-attack-north-korea-lazarus-group/

Residents of burning London tower tried to warn about fire safety in their blog

Image: REX/Shutterstock

Residents in the west London high-rise block which was engulfed in a massive blaze repeatedly warned that Grenfell Tower was a huge fire risk.

In a blog post from November 2016, Grenfell Action Group accused the building’s landlord the Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organisation (KCTMO) of ignoring health and safety legislation on the 24-storey block.

The post, entitled “KCTMO Playing with fire!”, suggests that “only a catastrophic event will expose the ineptitude and incompetence of our landlord, theKCTMO, and bring an end to the dangerous living conditions and neglect of health and safety legislation that they inflict upon their tenants and leaseholders.”

Image: screenshot

It goes on to affirm that only an incident “that results in serious loss of life of KCTMO residents will allow the external scrutiny to occur that will shine a light on the practices that characterise the malign governance of this non-functioning organisation.”

According to the residents, the incident was narrowly avoided in 2013, when they experienced power surging which was later found to have been caused by faulty wiring.

In October 2015, after a fire hit another KCTMO property, the 14-storey Adair Tower in North Kensington, the management was handed enforcement orders by the local council compelling them to improve the fire safety in the escape staircases and install self-closing devices on all the tower block’s front doors, the blog says.

Grenfwell Tower had recently been upgraded by Rydon, in a 8.6 million ($11 million) contract as part of a 57 million borough-wide regeneration in the borough.

Improvements included rain screen cladding, curtain wall faade, and replacement windows.

However, pieces of cladding could be seen on the streets, and some residents complained “cheap flammable” plastic cladding was used.

Residents also said they never received proper fire safety instructions from KCTMO, or practice drills. They were only informed by a temporary notice stuck in the lift and one announcement in a recent regeneration newsletter “that they should remain in their flats in the event of fire.”

A blog entry posted after the blaze said:

Watching breaking news about the Grenfell Tower fire catastrophe. Too soon to even guess at numbers of casualties and fatalities.

Regular readers of this blog will know that we have posted numerous warnings in recent years about the very poor fire safety standards at Grenfell Tower and elsewhere in RBKC.

ALL OUR WARNINGS FELL ON DEAF EARS and we predicted that a catastrophe like this was inevitable and just a matter of time.

It also listed a series of blog posts showing that concerns about emergency exits and lack of safety procedures were raised as far back as 2012.

A local building expert told LBC he expressed concern over the fire risk at Grenfell Tower two years ago.

“On the stairwells, the doors are not hermetically sealed fire doors,” he said.

“When you have a fire door, you have a door that’s sealed. You do not have soft wood liners, you have hard wood because they take longer to burn in.

“If it’s correctly installed, nothing could get through a fire door for two hours. But the wrong doors for fire doors were there.”

The London Fire Brigade confirmed there have been a number of fatalities in the fire, which occurred in the early hours of Wednesday. As of Wednesday evening, Metropolitan Police confirmed 12 fatalities but the number was expected to rise.

More than 50 patients have been taken to five different hospitals.

The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea said the causes of the fire “will be fully investigated”:

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/14/london-tower-grenfell-fire-residents-blog/

IBM will use data science and tech to tackle the world’s biggest problems

IBM Watson's computer housing case.
Image: Andrew Spear for The Washington Post / Getty Images

IBM is channeling its science and tech expertise into tackling some of the world’s biggest problems.

On Wednesday, the tech giant announced the launch of Science for Social Good, a new program that partners IBM researchers with postdoctoral academic fellows and nonprofits to take on societal issues through data.

With the new initiative, IBM announced 12 projects planned for 2017. Each Science for Social Good project aligns with one or more of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, the United Nations’ blueprint to address some of the globe’s biggest inequalities and threats by the year 2030.

Science for Social Good covers issues like improving emergency aid and combating the opioid crisis, and the projects all use data science, analytics, and artificial intelligence to develop solutions.

The projects chosen for this years Social Good program cover predicting new diseases, alleviating illiteracy and hunger, and helping people out of poverty.”

One project is called Emergency Food Best Practice: The Digital Experience, which plans to compile emergency food distribution best practices and share it with nonprofits through an interactive digital tool. IBM will partner with nonprofit St. John’s Bread & Life to develop the tool based on the nonprofit’s distribution model, which helps the organization seamlessly serve more than 2,500 meals each day in New York City.

Another project is called Overcoming Illiteracy, which will use AI to allow low-literate adults to “navigate the information-dense world with confidence.” The project hopes to decode complex texts (such as product descriptions and manuals), extract the basic message, and present it to users through visuals and simple spoken messages. While this project doesn’t solve the global literacy crisis, it will allow low-literate adults engage with text independently.

“The projects chosen for this years Social Good program cover an important range of topics including predicting new diseases, promoting innovation, alleviating illiteracy and hunger, and helping people out of poverty,” Arvind Krishna, director of IBM Research, said in a statement. “What unifies them all is that, at the core, they necessitate major advances in science and technology. Armed with the expertise of our partners and drawing on a wealth of new data, tools and experiences, Science for Social Good can offer new solutions to the problems our society is facing.”

IBM hopes the initiative will build off the success of the company’s noted supercomputer, Watson, which has helped address health care, education, and environmental challenges since its development.

Six pilot projects were conducted in 2016 in order to develop the Science for Social Good initiative. These projects covered a broad range of topics, such as health care, humanitarian relief, and global innovation.

A particularly successful project used machine learning techniques to better understand the spread of the Zika virus. Using complex data, the team developed a predictive model that identified which primate species should be targeted for Zika virus surveillance and management. The results of the project are now leading new testing in the field to help prevent the spread of the disease.

To learn more about current and past projects, visit the Science for Social Good website.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/07/ibm-science-for-social-good/