Robert Pirsig: Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance author dies aged 88

Book telling the father-son story of a motorcycle trip across the western United States was published in 1974 and quickly became a best-seller

Robert Pirsig, author of the influential 1970s philosophical novel Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, has died at the age of 88.

Peter Hubbard, executive editor of his publisher William Morrow & Co, said in a statement that Pirsigs wife Wendy had confirmed his death at his home in Maine after a period of failing health.

Published in 1974 after being rejected by more than 100 other publishers, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, was the father-son story of a motorcycle trip across the western United States. Loosely autobiographical, it also contained flashbacks to a period in which the author was diagnosed as schizophrenic.

The book quickly became a best-seller. Pirsig said its protagonist set out to resolve the conflict between classic values that create machinery, such as a motorcycle, and romantic values, such as experiencing the beauty of a country road.

Born in Minneapolis, Pirsig had a high IQ and graduated high school at the age of 15. He earned a degree in philosophy and also worked as a technical writer and instructor of English before being hospitalised for mental illness in the early 1960s.

His philosophical thinking and personal experiences during these years, including a 1968 motorcycle trip across the US West with his eldest son, Christopher, formed the core of the narrative of the novel.

Pirsig worked on the sequel, Lila: An Inquiry into Morals for 17 years before its publication in 1991. The story traced a sailboat journey taken by two fictitious characters along Americas eastern coast.

Pirsig lived the last 30 years in South Berwick, Maine and is survived by his wife Wendy, two children and three grandchildren. His son Chris died in 1979.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/apr/25/robert-pirsig-zen-and-the-art-of-motorcycle-maintenance-author-dies-aged-88

Elton John cancels Las Vegas shows due to ‘potentially deadly’ infection

The singer announced he was pulling out of several shows after contracting a bacterial infection in South America that led to two nights in intensive care

Sir Elton John has pulled out of a series of concerts in Las Vegas due to an unusual bacterial infection he contracted in South America, which left him in intensive care.

The singer announced he was pulling out of the shows on Monday in a statement that explained that he spent two nights in intensive care and was released on 22 April after becoming ill on a flight to the UK from Chile.

During a recent, successful tour of South America, Elton contracted a harmful and unusual bacterial infection, the statement read.

During his return flight home from Santiago, Chile he became violently ill. Upon returning to the UK, Eltons doctors admitted him to hospital, where he underwent immediate treatment to remove the infection. After spending two nights in intensive care followed by an extended stay in hospital, Elton was released from hospital.

It added that the infection was rare and potentially deadly but that the stars medical team identified it quickly and that he is expected to make a full and complete recovery.

Elton John also added: I am so fortunate to have the most incredible and loyal fans and apologise for disappointing them. I am extremely grateful to the medical team for their excellence in looking after me so well.

The affected shows were part of the Million Dollar Piano show and were due to take place at Caesars Palace in April and May, while another gig in Bakersfield, California, on 6 May was also cancelled.

The singer is expected to return for his scheduled gigs at Twickenham, in London on 3 June.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/apr/24/elton-john-cancels-concerts-las-vegas-bacteria-infection

Two-thirds of Americans support gun limits in public places study

At least 64% of those surveyed do not support carrying guns in places such as schools and college campuses, study finds as states move to ease restrictions

Two-thirds of Americans believe that guns should be restricted in many public places, according to a study published on Thursday.

The study, by a group of leading public health researchers, found that at least 64% of those surveyed did not support carrying guns on college campuses, in places of worship, government buildings, schools, bars or sports stadiums. Even among gun owners, a majority did not approve of guns in bars or in schools. The survey published in the American Journal of Public Health comes as a number of states have passed laws to expand where guns can be carried in public.

Thats an important finding because it goes against the general trend of what lawmakers are doing, said Julia Wolfson, a professor of public health at the University of Michigan and one of the studys co-authors.

Already in 2017, Arkansas has passed a bill allowing guns on college campuses, in government buildings, and in bars. Georgias governor, Nathan Deal, is considering a proposal that would allow concealed weapons at colleges. And state legislators in New Hampshire, North Dakota, and Iowa have passed so-called constitutional carry bills, eliminating permitting requirements for carrying concealed weapons.

The new findings by researchers at Harvard University, Northeastern University, and Johns Hopkins University are the latest in a set of studies that are painting the most definitive portrait of American gun ownership in two decades.

The authors asked nearly 4,000 respondents whether they thought people should be allowed to bring firearms into nine public places: restaurants, schools, college campuses, bars, government buildings, sports stadiums, retail stores, service settings such as barber shops, and places of worship.

Only 9.4% of respondents said they supported allowing guns in all nine public places. Restaurants, service settings, and retail stores were the only locations in which more than 30% of respondents said that people should be allowed to carry firearms.

The survey was conducted online in 2015 on behalf of the academics by GfK, a market research company, as part of a larger inquiry into the habits and attitudes of American gun owners. The survey, which oversampled for veterans and gun owners, asked respondents to specify if they owned a firearm or lived in a household with one.

Support for carrying guns in public was higher among gun owners than among those who did not own firearms.

A majority of gun owners surveyed supported carrying guns in restaurants, service settings, and retail establishments. But three out of four gun owners said they did not approve of carrying guns in bars, and two-thirds said they did not feel firearms should be allowed in schools.

The survey found that support for guns in public places did not vary by region of the country. Controlled for gun-owning status, respondents who live in the south, where many states freely permit carrying guns in public, were no more supportive of the practice than respondents in the north-east, where gun laws are generally stricter.

Two of the studys co-authors, Deborah Azrael of Harvard University and Matthew Miller of Northeastern University, conducted a similar survey on attitudes to guns in public in 1999. Generally, Americans have become more accepting of guns in public places over the last 18 years: while in 1999 just 4% of respondents said they supported guns on college campuses, 22.5% now approve of campus carry.

But the authors point out that the different language used could account for that change. The earlier questionnaire asked how respondents would feel about people in your community carrying in select public places. The new survey asked about attitudes toward people who are authorized to carry firearms in your community, which in some states states requires training and approval from law enforcement.

Its difficult to account for the growing acceptance of guns in public, the authors said. Its the $64,000 question, said Azrael. Whats happened in the past 15 years? Many more laws have made it possible to carry guns anywhere. More people own handguns than did in the past. It wouldnt surprise me if they also wanted to carry them more places.

In the nearly two decades between the surveys, many states have made laws around carrying guns in public more permissive. In 2000, seven states had an outright ban on carrying concealed weapons in public, and only Vermont allowed its residents to carry a gun without a permit. Now, all 50 states allow some form of concealed carry, and a dozen states have scrapped their permitting requirements for carrying firearms.

And in Congress, lawmakers could soon consider a proposal that would dramatically alter where concealed weapons are allowed in the country. Under legislation filed by congressman Richard Hudson, a North Carolina Republican, states that set high bars for concealed carry licenses would be compelled to welcome armed visitors from any state that recognizes its residents right to concealed carry. As written, the bill would allow someone who lives in a state such as Kansas, with no permitting requirement, to carry a gun in a state like New York, which has very strict standards.

The proposal is the top legislative priority of the National Rifle Association, a leading donor to Donald Trumps campaign.

The political conversation around guns has been dominated by the gun lobby, Wolfson said. Despite that fact, Wolfson added that she and her colleagues were surprised that there was such low support for carrying guns in public places.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/apr/20/gun-control-restrictions-schools-campuses-churches-stadiums