Benchmark’s Uber Suit Signals End of Era for Imperious Founders

When Uber Technologies Inc. backer Benchmark Capital filed a lawsuit against the startup’s founder Travis Kalanick for using allegedly fraudulent means to pack the board with his loyalists, it sent a strong signal that Silicon Valley’s so-called founder-friendly era is coming to an end.

Going back years, venture firms have given Kalanick and his peers outsize control and influence over their companies. Critics say this has led founders to take a freewheeling approach to running their companies, loading up on shares for themselves and their friends and presiding over toxic workplaces.

At the heart of the Benchmark lawsuit is a provision that venture capitalists say stands out for its deference to Kalanick, and is highly unusual. It allowed the Uber founder to personally appoint three new members to Uber’s eight-seat board, effectively letting him slant the board his way after he resigned. 

According to Benchmark, Kalanick got investors to sign off on the measure “fraudulently,”  by, among other things, hiding “gross mismanagement” at the company. Jimmy Asci, a spokesman for Kalanick, said the lawsuit is “completely without merit and riddled with lies and false allegations.”

On Friday three other investors sent a letter to Uber’s board, shareholders and Benchmark, saying the suit was designed to “hold the company hostage” and asked Benchmark to step down from the board. The investors are Sherpa Capital’s Shervin Pishevar, Yucaipa Companies’ Ron Burkle and Maverick’s Adam Leber. They didn’t immediately respond or couldn’t be reached for comment. Members of Uber’s board, not including Kalanick or Benchmark’s Matt Cohler, said they were “disappointed that a disagreement between shareholders has resulted in litigation,” according to an emailed statement.

Kalanick is far from the only founder deemed to have abused investors’ trust in him. Other examples include Jawbone Inc. founder Hosain Rahman and Tanium Inc. Chief Executive Officer Orion Hindawi, who were both given considerable autonomy or control by boards and then disappointed in their leadership. Rahman led Jawbone into bankruptcy and has now launched a long-shot bid to become a player in medical devices. Hindawi was forced to apologize after past and current employees described abusive behavior that prompted a talent exodus. 

In the 1990s, it wasn’t unusual for venture firms to replace founders as CEOs, usually because the investors believed the company needed a leader with more experience. That practice fell out of favor but has resurfaced in recent years.

Take GitHub Inc., the developer platform. In early 2014, a former Github employee, Julie Ann Horvath, complained that co-workers—going right up to company’s co-founder and CEO, Tom Preston-Werner—had harassed and discriminated against her. Preston-Werner ended up resigning after an internal investigation; in a more forgiving time, he might have taken a leave of absence and returned.

The following year, Parker Conrad, founder and chief executive of Zenefits resigned after news broke that he was using unlicensed brokers to sell health insurance in several states.

In those cases, the founders agreed to step down. In other instances, VCs have discovered that the relatively recent practice of ceding voting control has made forced resignations impossible.

At venture-backed company Theranos, once valued at $9 billion and now worth next to nothing, disgraced founder Elizabeth Holmes controls 98 percent of voting shares. That has allowed her to continue as chief executive even after it turned out her vaunted blood-testing technology didn’t work, putting the company’s future in peril.

One reason VCs tolerated over-privileged CEOS—at Theranos, Uber, Snap, and other companies—was because so much money flooded into tech, making it easy for founders of the most promising startups to shop around. Last year, $41.6 billion was raised by venture firms, the most since the dotcom era, according to the National Venture Capital Association.

In an extreme case, at vegan food maker Hampton Creek Inc., most of the board, not founder Josh Tetrick,  was forced to resign after directors lost all rights due to the voting control they had allowed Tetrick to amass.

But once again, venture firms are wising up.

Today, while more late-stage private companies are creating classes of shares with extra voting power, only 27 percent of recipients of those shares are founders and management, according to a study by law firm Fenwick & West. Three years ago, 43 percent of recipients were founders and management, rather than investors.

For a long time venture firms were loath to crack down on founders for fear they’d go elsewhere for capital. But that theory doesn’t really hold up, says angel investor Keval Desai, a backer of Optimizely, The RealReal and others. “Benchmark’s reputation has been built over many decades, and other entrepreneurs who have taken money from them will be proof that Benchmark isn’t in the business of suing their entrepreneurs,” he says. “Benchmark will be fine.”

    Read more: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-11/benchmark-signals-era-of-imperious-startup-founder-is-coming-to-an-end

    Lucifer Heat Wave Keeps Parts of Europe in Red Alert

    Belgrade, Serbia (AP) — No wonder it's been dubbed "Lucifer."

    A relentless heat wave that gripped parts of Europe this week has sent temperatures soaring to record highs for several days, causing at least two deaths and prompting authorities to issue severe weather warnings.

    "It is just too much," real estate agent Sasa Jovanovic, 52, said during an early morning walk in Serbia's capital, Belgrade, where the temperature was forecast to hit 39 degrees Celsius (102.2 degrees Fahrenheit) Saturday. "Sometimes it feels as if I cannot breathe."

    The extreme heat stifling Serbia, Romania, Croatia and parts of Spain, France and Italy has fueled wildfires, damaged crops and strained energy and water supplies. Authorities in some areas issued traffic restrictions and banned outdoor work during the hottest part of the day.

    Spain's national weather service on Saturday issued an emergency warning for high temperatures in 31 of the country's 50 provinces as forecasts predicted temperatures of up to 44 C (111.2 F).

    Western and northern Europe, in contrast, was experiencing colder and wetter weather.

    Although southern Europe is used to scorching summers, meteorologists have warned that hot spells lasting several days aren't that common.

    The public health institute in Belgrade issued heat instructions, telling people to keep wet towels on windows if there is no air conditioning, and avoid physical strain and alcohol.

    Thousands of residents sought refuge from the heat at the city's recreation area, swimming in the local lake and the Danube or the Sava rivers. Some of those who ventured to the city center dipped their feet or wet their hair in the fountains.

    The high temperatures came as a shock to Australian Mira Balic, who was visiting Serbia at a time when it's winter in the Southern Hemisphere. Belgrade was among the hottest cities in Europe on Saturday and hotter than Egypt's capital, Cairo — which is normally far hotter than central Europe.

    "I came here from Australia, where the temperature is 4 degrees (Celsius; 39.2F," Balic gasped. "This heat is killing me!"

    Animal rights groups urged citizens to place plastic bowls with water outside their buildings and in parks for the city's many stray dogs.

    In Croatia, health authorities have reported a surge in emergency calls over the past week. They appealed to the thousands of tourists vacationing along the country's Adriatic coast to be careful on the beaches and while traveling.

    In Romania, police banned heavy traffic on major roads in daylight hours during the weekend because of the heat wave, while trains slowed down. A train service in southern Serbia also was delayed earlier this week after tracks buckled in the heat.

    Romania reported two heat-related deaths — a 45-year-old man collapsed and died Friday while working in a field in the northeast, while a 60-year-old man died of a heart attack in the street in an eastern port Thursday.

    The state railway company in neighboring Hungary said it would distribute water at busy terminals. At the Budapest Zoo, Beliy and Seriy, a pair of 2-year-old polar bear cubs, were given huge chunks of ice and freezing-cold watermelons to help them withstand the weather conditions.

    Some 15 wildfires have been reported in Albania, and dozens of others throughout the region. Hot and dry weather has scorched crops amid fears of water shortages in Italy and Serbia as authorities appealed for care in consumption.

    In the Alpine nation of Slovenia, authorities reported earlier this week the first-ever "tropical night" at 1,500 meters (4,920 feet) in the mountains, meaning temperatures were higher than 20 C (68 F) during the night.

    ___

    Alison Mutler in Bucharest, Romania; Predrag Milic in Podgorica, Montenegro; Joseph Wilson in Madrid, and Pablo Gorondi in Budapest, Hungary, Ivana Bzganovic from Belgrade, Serbia, contributed to this report.

      Read more: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-05/-lucifer-heat-wave-keeps-parts-of-europe-in-red-alert

      Doctor delivers a baby right before she gives birth to her own

      A big day.
      Image: Shutterstock / Angyalosi Beata

      A doctor in Kentucky and her patient will always remember their babies’ birthdays.

      Amanda Hess, an OB/GYN in Frankfort, Kentucky, was in the hospital as she prepared to give birth to her daughter. While she waited, Hess heard another expectant mother who was closer to giving birth.

      The doctor went to the room, where a woman who happened to be one of her patients was fully dilated. The doctor on call was on his way to the hospital, but the baby was coming. So Hess stepped in and handled the delivery right before she went back to her own room to give birth.

      I just put on another gown to cover up my backside and put on some boots over my shoes, to keep from getting any fluid and all that stuff on me, and went down to her room and I knew her,” Hess told WKYT.

      “She was just glad to be able to get to push and have the baby out and not have to wait any longer,” she added.

      Then, Hess gave birth to her own daughter, Ellen Joyce.

      Congratulations to the two mothers! Now time for maternity leave.

      Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/29/doctor-delivers-baby-gives-birth/

      Here’s What Abe Can Learn From His Flying Visit to the Nordics

      Shinzo Abe may draw inspiration from his Nordic hosts to tackle three of his country’s biggest problems: chronically slow growth, an aging population and a stubbornly high gender gap (Spoiler alert: The solutions are closely related).

      The Japanese prime minister will be paying a visit to Sweden, Finland and Denmark after attending the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg. It’s unclear if any major business will be conducted (he’s just reached a major free trade agreement with the European Union), but that doesn’t make the two-day visit less interesting.

      Population Growth

      While in Stockholm, for instance, he may want to take a close look at how Sweden has successfully boosted short-term growth while also laying the groundwork for higher expansion rates in the future. The key is population growth.

      Sweden breached the landmark figure of 10 million inhabitants in January, with the total projected to reach 13 million in 2060, according to Statistics Sweden. Japan’s population, in contrast, is expected to drop. A young and growing population is key to maintaining a generous welfare state (the number of Swedes aged 65 and above will account for a quarter of the total population by 2060). In Sweden’s case, it has also helped boost growth via extra investments, for instance in housing.

      Sweden’s growth is fueled by two factors: Immigration (the country received one of the highest proportions of refugees per capita in Europe in 2015) and a birthrate that’s one of the highest in the continent.

      Gender Equality

      One good way of boosting the birthrate in a mature economy is to empower women. On this front, the Nordics are the experts.

      Source: WEF, 2016

      Abe’s stop in Helsinki would be a good place from where to steal some ideas on how to reduce the gender gap: Finland ranks second in the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Index, while Japan is closer to the bottom. Of Finland, WEF says it has "fully closed the gender gap" on education and health and is the global runner-up in terms of political empowerment.

      While in Copenhagen, Abe may want to reflect on the fact that Denmark is stuck at sub-2 percent growth rates for the foreseeable future. Two reasons are being put forward for that: A slow down in its pursuit of full gender equality and a tightening of immigration laws that has left the country short of skilled workers.

        Country Gender gap (global ranking)
        Finland 2
        Sweden 4
        Denmark 19
        Japan 111

        Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-07-08/here-s-what-abe-can-learn-from-his-flying-visit-to-the-nordics

        Tourists, Locals Buy Nevada’s Legal Recreational Marijuana

        Las Vegas (AP) — Cheers and long lines of tourists and locals alike greeted the first day of sales of recreational marijuana on Saturday as Nevada became the fifth state with stores selling pot to the public in a market that is expected to outpace all others in the U.S. thanks to the millions of visitors who flock to Las Vegas each year.

        Veteran consumers, first-timers, twenty-somethings and retirees were among those who defied triple-digit temperatures before they made it into stores across the Las Vegas area, some of which opened shortly after midnight and later provided free water, live music, valet parking and coveted promotions on their valuable product. Eager employees guided customers and answered questions from product potency to Nevada's consumption regulations.

        Minnesota resident Edgar Rosas Lorenzo on Saturday flew with his family to Sin City for his sister's wedding. But even before he checked in to his hotel, he stopped at a dispensary on the Las Vegas Strip.

        Lorenzo, 21, said he learned of the legalization of recreational marijuana in Nevada while he was at the airport waiting for his flight to depart. He drove with his sister and soon-to-be brother-in-law from the rental car facility in Las Vegas straight to the dispensary. They waited in line about 40 minutes before he could buy one-eighth of an ounce of marijuana and hemp wraps.

        "It was worth the wait. I'm going to come get some more tomorrow," Lorenzo said after paying about $60 in cash at Essence dispensary. "It helps me sleep. I get back pain. I have a slipped disk."

        Some dispensaries took to social media to spread the word or tried to draw in buyers with special events. Some gave away free marijuana to their first 100 customers, and at least one entered buyers into a raffle for free pot for a year.

        Those 21 and older with a valid ID can buy up to an ounce of pot. As of Friday, the state had licensed 44 dispensaries to sell recreational marijuana. Thirty-nine of those shops are in the Las Vegas area.

        Tourists — 42 million of which stop in Sin City every year — are expected to make nearly two of every three recreational pot purchases in Nevada. But people can only use the drug in a private home as it remains illegal to consume it in public, including the Strip, hotels and casinos. Violators face a $600 fine.

        "I have yet to figure that out," Lorenzo said of where he will smoke the weed he got at the Essence dispensary, which along with others had stacks of pamphlets stating the regulations in every checkout station.

        Meanwhile, Kristin Deneal got in line outside a pot shop at 5:45 a.m., after a different store that opened at midnight closed before she could make a purchase. She brought a folding chair and sat by the door, striking conversations with the security guard and others as the line continued to grow before doors opened at 9 a.m.

        Deneal, a Las Vegas resident, said she is elated at being able to legally buy the drug that for decades she has had to buy through acquaintances. Smoking marijuana helps her cope with health conditions while also working a stressful job at a bank, she said.

        "It looks like they have enough stuff for everyone, it's just a question of getting through the door," Deneal, 57, said.

        State Sen. Tick Segerblom, one of the main proponents of marijuana legalization in Nevada, made the first purchase at The Source dispensary at a strip mall. Deneal and others followed. An hour after the door opened, at least 80 transactions had been recorded.

        Some facilities are in strip malls, while others, in stereotypical Las Vegas fashion, are in neighborhoods shared by strip clubs. Some dispensaries have ATMs inside because they only accept cash transactions for marijuana.

        Lorenzo immediately posted photos of his stash on Snapchat. His friends have said they're jealous and asked where he bought the products, he said, adding that he'll plan another trip to Las Vegas specifically to legally purchase marijuana, not to visit the city's world famous casinos.

        "We just got here … Instead of looking around in Vegas, I'm in a dispensary," he said.

        In the afternoon, people walking along the Strip seemed to be obeying the state's ban on public pot smoking.

        Recreational marijuana sales began shortly after midnight, just months after voters approved legalization in November, marking the fastest turnaround from the ballot box to retail sales in the country.

        Hundreds of people lined up outside dispensaries that opened from 12 a.m. to 3 a.m. and had to turn away customers like Deneal. At Essence on the Strip, people were excited and well-behaved as a lone security guard looked on. A cheer erupted when the doors opened.

        Despite the limits on where people can get high and restrictions on where the industry can advertise, dispensaries worked furiously to prepare for the launch. They stamped labels on pot products, stocked up their shelves, added security and installed extra checkout stations.

        Nevada joins Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Alaska in allowing adults to buy the drug that's still banned by the federal government.

        "I've been living in Vegas for 15 years, and I keep missing the cities that legalize marijuana and edibles. So I'm happy that it's here now," said Babs Daitch, who was waiting in line.

        ___

        Associated Press writer Sally Ho contributed to this report.

          Read more: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-07-01/nevada-launches-sales-of-legal-recreational-marijuana

          People are trolling the Obamacare repeal hashtag #HellerVoteYes

          Nevada Sen. Dean Heller is a no on the Senate's healthcare bill.
          Image: Monsivais/AP/REX/Shutterstock

          Nevada Sen. Dean Heller became the first Republican on Friday to say he wouldn’t vote for the Senate’s bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act because of its cuts to healthcare benefits for low-income Americans.

          Naturally, a conservative, pro-Trump interest group is lobbying the senator to change his mind about the GOP effort to replace Obamacare. One of them promoted a trending hashtag on Twitter: “HellerVoteYes.”

          Well, since the Republicans’ bill would eliminate most health services provided to the poor through Medicaid and raise costs for millions of Americans, people quickly seized on the hashtag to lobby Heller in the other directionand criticize Twitter for promoting the pro-repeal hashtag in the first place.

          Four other Republicans are set to vote no on the bill, but only because they don’t think it goes far enough. Maybe #HellerVoteNo will start trending too.

          Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/24/hellervoteyes-obamacare-repeal-senate-healthcare-twitter/

          Mom shares the crushing cost of her son’s medical care before the Senate votes on healthcare bill

          Before the Senate votes on its bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act, many people are sharing stories of how the bill would affect them.

          One story struck a chord with thousands of Twitter users this weekend. The mom of 3-year-old Ethan Vikash shared a photo of a medical bill for her son’s open heart surgery. The 24-line item bill came to $231,115 for 10 hours in surgery, one week in the hospital’s cardiac intensive care unit, and one week on the hospital’s cardiac floor.

          With insurance, Ethan’s family only had to pay $500 out-of-pocket. But if Congress passes a healthcare bill that imposes lifetime caps on what insurance companies will cover, families that deal with childhood illnesses or heart conditions like Ethan’s would be well beyond priced out of life-saving care.

          The thread covering the cost of Ethan’s healthcare got turned into a Twitter moment.

          The story resonated with thousands of Twitter users who are scared about what will happen if Congress and President Donald Trump gut the Affordable Care Act’s restrictions on lifetime caps.

          Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/24/twitter-moment-lifetime-caps-healthcare-gop/

          The Latest: UK’s May Meets Fire Survivors, Faces Criticism

          London (AP) — The Latest on the London high-rise fire (all times local):

          8:40 p.m.

          British Prime Minister Theresa May, facing criticism for the government's handling of the Grenfell Tower fire disaster, has met with 15 survivors and community leaders at her official residence at 10 Downing Street in London.

          The meeting lasted more than two hours Saturday but the group did not speak to reporters gathered outside.

          The meeting is unlikely to quell complaints that May has been slow to reach out to fire survivors, despite her announcement of a $6.4 million emergency fund to help displaced families. Some 600 people were living in the tower's 120 apartments. Police say 58 people at the tower are now confirmed or presumed dead. All the rest are homeless.

          May said after the meeting there have been "huge frustrations" in the community as people tried to get information about the fire investigation. She says "the support on the ground for families who needed help or basic information in the initial hours after this appalling disaster was not good enough."

          ___

          3:40 p.m.

          London police say 58 people who were in Grenfell Tower are still missing and assumed to be dead.

          Police Commander Stuart Cundy said Saturday that this number, which was based on reports from the public, may rise. He says it will take weeks or longer to recover and identify all the dead in the public housing block that was devastated by a fire early Wednesday.

          He said there may have been people in the tower that police are not aware of, which would add to the death toll.

          He says the search for remains had been paused because of safety concerns but has resumed. Emergency workers have reached the top of the 24-story tower.

          Cundy promised an exhausting investigation into the tragedy. He says "my heart goes out to those affected."

          ___

          2:20 p.m.

          London's fire department says that the reason for the subway closure near the high-rise fire disaster is because of a "short-term risk of some debris falling onto the tracks."

          Earlier, a sign at a Tube station said that the service suspension was because of the "safety" of nearby Grenfell Tower, suggesting structural concerns. A new sign was put up, removing that detail.

          A fire department spokesman said crews are working to secure the debris so that two subway lines could be reopened as soon as possible.

          At least 30 people were killed in Wednesday's inferno, which left Grenfell Tower a charred hulk.

          ___

          1:30 p.m.

          Service on two London Underground lines has been partially suspended because of concerns about the safety of the high-rise in the fire that killed at least 30 people.

          The 24-story Grenfell Tower in the north Kensington neighborhood in west London is near several major transport hubs. The building was gutted in a blaze early Wednesday morning that has also left dozens missing and hundreds of others homeless.

          Major roads near the stricken building were open Saturday. Police have established a security cordon around the building to protect public safety and allow searchers easy access to the wrecked building.

          ___

          1:20 p.m.

          British Prime Minister Theresa May will meet with survivors of the London high-rise fire at her Downing Street office.

          The announcement by a spokesman comes a day after May was heckled during a visit to the west London neighborhood where Wednesday's inferno took place. At least 30 people have been killed, hundreds of others have been left homeless and dozens of others are missing. There has been growing public anger at the government's initial response to the disaster's aftermath and reports that external paneling put up during a recent renovation contributed to the flames' rapid spread.

          May is chairing a government task force on the fire and a spokesman says that she will meet afterward with "a group of residents, victims, volunteers and community leaders" at No. 10 Downing Street.

          ___

          12:45 p.m.

          A soccer player says that he will donate 50 pounds (more than $60) for each minute he plays at a European youth tournament to the victims of London's high-rise inferno.

          Hector Bellerin, who is in Spain's team at UEFA's European Under-21 Championship, made the announcement on Twitter , saying "please support in any way." Spain faces Macedonia on Saturday night in the tournament, which is being played in Poland. If Bellerin plays a full 90 minutes, not including added time, he would donate 4,500 pounds (about $5,750) per match. Bellerin, a defender, also plays for London club Arsenal.

          At least 30 people were killed in the fire at Grenfell Tower in the west London neighborhood of north Kensington. Hundreds of others have been left homeless and dozens are missing.

          ___

          10:50 a.m.

          Queen Elizabeth II and her husband Prince Philip have observed a minute of silence to honor the victims of the London high-rise fire.

          The queen and Philip stood silently before the start of the annual Trooping the Color procession that marks the queen's official birthday.

          She said earlier that the national mood is somber but that Britain is resolute in the face of adversity.

          The queen's official birthday is marked in June when the weather is often nicer than in April, the actual month of her birth. She is 91.

          At least 30 people have died in Wednesday's fire and dozens are missing.

          ___

          10:20 a.m.

          British health authorities say they are still treating 19 patients, 10 of whom remain in critical condition after the London high-rise fire.

          NHS England says the injured are being treated in four London hospitals. At least 30 people were killed in Wednesday's inferno at the Grenfell Tower, while dozens of others are missing.

          The fire at the 24-story building has led to community anger and protests over the British government's response. The public is also demanding answers about how the blaze spread so quickly amid reports that the recently-renovated building's exterior paneling fueled the flames.

          ___

          7:50 a.m.

          More than 3 million pounds ($3.8 million) has been raised for victims of the London high-rise fire that has killed at least 30 people and left dozens homeless.

          Londoners and others have also donated huge amounts of food, water and clothing, and shelter, to survivors.

          Three appeals on the JustGiving site have helped to raise the 3 million pounds, and London's Evening Standard newspaper has launched a separate appeal that has raised at least 1.5 million pounds ($1.9 million) by Saturday morning. The British government has announced a 5 million-pound ($6.3 million) emergency fund for the victims.

          The inferno Wednesday morning at the 24-story Grenfell Tower has led to community anger and protests over the government's response.

          ___

          7:20 a.m.

          London firefighters are continuing the grim search after a high-rise fire that killed at least 30 people as public anger about the blaze continues to grow.

          Many are demanding answers for how the blaze spread so quickly. Britain's Press Association says around 70 people are missing.

          Queen Elizabeth II marked her official birthday Saturday by saying Britain remains "resolute in the face of adversity" after the horrendous fire and recent extremist attacks in London and Manchester.

          The 91-year-old monarch said it is "difficult to escape a very somber mood" on what is normally a day of celebration.

          The government has promised a full public inquiry.

          Scuffles broke out near the Kensington and Chelsea town hall offices Friday as demonstrators chanting "We want justice!" surged toward the doors.

            Read more: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-06-17/the-latest-about-4-million-raised-for-london-fire-victims

            Google Doodle honors Susan La Flesche Picotte, the first Native American to earn a medical degree

            Google honored a deserving figure in American history on Saturday: Susan La Flesche Picotte, the first Native American to earn a medical degree.

            Picotte was illustrated as the Google homepage’s Google Doodle on Saturday in honor of what would have been her 152nd birthday.

            Image: screenshot/google

            Picotte was a doctor and an activist. The Omaha Native American physician advocated for land, and money for the sale of land to be paid to members of the Omaha tribe. As a reformer for public health, she was a leader in the temperance movement and fought tuberculosis on the reservation where she worked as a physician.

            She also advocated for the elimination of communal drinking cups and the installation of screen doors to keep out disease-carrying insects, Google said in their description.

            The Google Doodle features the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, where Picotte earned her medical degree, and the hospital she built on her hometown reservation in 1913.

            Happy birthday, Dr. Sue!

            Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/06/17/dr-sue-google-doodle/

            URGENT: The Latest: 3 Australians Among Injured in London Attacks

            London (AP) — The latest on the attacks in the London Bridge area (all times local):

            12:18 a.m.

            Australia's foreign minister says three Australians have been injured in the knife attacks at London Bridge and in London's Borough Market.

            Foreign Minister Julie Bishop says Candice Hedge is recovering in St. Thomas' Hospital and Andrew Morrison had received stitches for a wound and was on his way home to Australia. Both had been stabbed in the neck. The government is still making inquiries into the third Australian's condition.

            Hedge, a 34-year-old waitress, has been living in Britain for about a year and was working in the Borough Markets area where witnesses say she was stabbed as she tried to hide under a table.

            She posted on social media: "Hey everyone, just so you know im doing ok. Bit of pain but I will survive."

            Morrison, an electrician from Darwin, posted on social media that he had been stabbed leaving Belushi's London Bridge bar after watching the Champions League soccer final.

            Morrison said in a video: "All of a sudden this guy comes up with a knife. I just, like, push him off. I walk into a pub and I'm like: 'Someone help me, I've just been stabbed.' "

            ___

            10:45 p.m.

            The SITE Intelligence Group says Islamic State's news agency is claiming fighters for the extremist group carried out the van and knife attack in London that left seven people dead.

            SITE said in a statement Sunday that the Islamic State's Aamaq news service cited "a security source" in the Arabic-language posting claiming the attack.

            Islamic State has often made such claims not just when it has sent attackers, but when extremists carrying out deadly plots were inspired by the group's ideology.

            It's the third attack this year that Islamic State has claimed in Britain, after the bombing in Manchester and a similar attack in the heart of London in March.

            The three attackers in Saturday's attack have not been identified.

            ___

            10:30 p.m.

            A Canadian woman who was among the seven people killed in the London van and knife attacks has been identified by her family as Christine Archibald.

            The Archibald family said in a statement released by the Canadian government on Sunday she worked in a homeless shelter until she moved to Europe to be with her fiance.

            Her family in Castlegar, British Columbia, says Archibald "would have had no understanding of the callous cruelty that caused her death."

            They say she was 30 years old.

            They asked those who want to honor her to volunteer their time or donate to a homeless shelter and to tell them "Chrissy sent you. "

            ___

            10:25 p.m.

            The city of London is convening a public vigil for the seven people killed in the van and knife attack on London Bridge and at nearby restaurants.

            A statement from Mayor Sadiq Khan's office said the vigil will be held at 6 p.m. local time on Monday at Potters Fields Park, an open space which surrounds City Hall on the River Thames near Tower Bridge.

            The mayor's office says the gathering is an opportunity for Londoners and visitors "to come together in solidarity to remember those who have lost their lives in Saturday's attack, to express sympathy with their families and loved ones and to show the world that we stand united in the face of those who seek to harm us and our way of life."

            Participants also will be invited to place flowers by the flagpoles outside City Hall.

            The invitation issued by Khan's office says the vigil also is meant to show "We will never let these cowards win and we will never be cowed by terrorism."

            ___

            7:50 p.m.

            France's foreign minister has announced that a French citizen was among those killed in the London attacks and that another remains missing.

            Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said on Sunday that seven other French nationals are hospitalized, four of them in serious condition.

            French officials had earlier said that four French were injured in the Saturday attacks on London Bridge and at nearby restaurants and pubs. Le Drian revised the count upward hours later.

            The minister tweeted that he was traveling to London on Monday.

            ___

            7:30 p.m.

            A resident of a suburban London town where police have conducted a raid says he thinks one of the London Bridge attackers was a neighbor who was known for religious proselytizing.

            Jibril Palomba said he recognized the man who lived in an apartment armed police raided early Sunday in Barking as one of the dead assailants in a widely published photo.

            Palomba says he and his wife first encountered the neighbor after his wife became concerned about how the man spoke to their children and others in a local park "about religion, Mohammed, this kind of stuff."

            He says his wife reported the neighbor's behavior to police, but nothing came of it.

            Palomba says he later became friendly with the man and never suspected he could be planning attacks.

            ___

            6:30 p.m.

            Social media giants Google and Twitter are responding to British Prime Minister Theresa May's statement that internet companies are complicit in terror attacks by giving extremist views "the safe space it needs to breed."

            Representatives for the two companies issued statements on Sunday saying they've been working to improve the technology to identify and remove inappropriate content, including posts and files that are terror-related.

            Nick Pickles, UK head of public policy at Twitter, said: "We continue to expand the use of technology as part of a systematic approach to removing this type of content."

            Google said, "We are committed to working in partnership with the government and NGOs to tackle these challenging and complex problems, and share the government's commitment to ensuring terrorists do not have a voice online."

            London police haven't said what role, if any, social media or information from the internet factored into Saturday night's attack that killed seven people.

            ___

            5:20 p.m.

            Cricket rivals India and Pakistan have held a minute's silence for the victims of the London Bridge attacks amid enhanced security at the Edgbaston ground in Birmingham, England.

            The West Midlands venue was hosting a game on Sunday as part of the two-week Champions Trophy tournament, which involves eight countries, including England.

            World cricket's governing body says extra security had been put in place after the Saturday night attacks in the capital.

            The International Cricket Council said in a statement that all team hotels went into lockdown and teams, match officials and staff were all quickly accounted for after the attacks.

            ___

            4:35 p.m.

            London's police counterterrorism chief says the public should expect to see increased security measures as authorities investigate the latest attack to strike Britain.

            Assistant Police Commissioner Mark Rowley said Sunday that police need to establish whether others were involved in planning Saturday night's vehicle and knife attack on London Bridge and at nearby restaurants.

            Seven people were killed in the attack and 21 are in critical condition.

            Rowley says police are confident that the three men fatally shot by officers in the minutes after the assault were the only attackers, but there is "clearly more to do" in the investigation.

            He says the white van they used to mow down pedestrians on London Bridge was rented by one of the men.

            Security cordons will remain around London Bridge indefinitely.

            ___

            4:25 p.m.

            London's assistant police commissioner says eight police officers fired "an unprecedented number" of bullets at the three men suspected of carrying out the attack on London Bridge and at nearby restaurants.

            Assistant Police Commissioner Mark Rowley said during a news conference on Sunday that the officers fired 50 rounds at the men, striking and wounding a member of the public in the process.

            Rowley says the injured civilian's injuries are not believed to be critical and there will be an independent investigation.

            The attackers were shot dead. Rowley says they had "already killed members of the public and had to be stopped immediately."

            ___

            4:15 p.m.

            Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says a Canadian is among those killed in the terrorist attack in London.

            Trudeau said in a statement Sunday he is heartbroken.

            Trudeau says Canada strongly condemns the senseless attack and stands united with the British people.

            He says the Canadian government will not provide more details about the citizen killed in Saturday night's attack out of respect for the family.

            ___

            4:10 p.m.

            British Prime Minister Theresa May has paid a private visit to some of the victims of the vehicle and knife attacks in central London.

            May visited King's College Hospital, which is caring for 14 of the 48 people hospitalized after the Saturday night attacks on London Bridge and at nearby restaurants.

            The National Health Service says 21 people remain in critical condition.

            A van mowed down pedestrians on the bridge before its occupants got out and started stabbing people. Police shot three attackers dead.

            Hundreds ran for their lives in the chaos.

            ___

            3:55 p.m.

            Former Secretary of State John Kerry says Britons are going to have to sort out whether tolerance of extremism has gone on for too long, as British Prime Minister Theresa May has said.

            Kerry tells NBC's "Meet the Press" that "a lot of ingredients" went into the attacks on London Bridge and at nearby restaurants Saturday night that left seven dead and nearly two dozen injured. Twelve people have been arrested.

            He says one of the issues the country needs to get a handle on is the experience of Muslim residents, who've "had a long-standing problem with respect to greater levels of alienation, a harder time assimilating into the broader British society."

            Kerry says the answer lies in building community to lessen the distance between governments and their people, a gap he thinks is a problem "all over the world."

            ___

            3:45 p.m.

            Germany's Foreign Ministry says German citizens were among the people wounded in the attack in London, and one of them has serious injuries.

            No further details were available Sunday on the Germans who were injured or the exact number.

            In all, dozens of people were injured in the attack Saturday night on London Bridge and nearby Borough Market.

            ___

            This item has been corrected to state that dozens were injured, not killed.

            ___

            3 p.m.

            A Romanian chef has been hailed as a hero on social media after he took in some 20 terrified people in the bakery where he worked as attackers targeted restaurants and bars in Borough Market.

            Florin Morariu, who works at the Bread Ahead bakery in the market, told The Associated Press: "We were looking out of the window because we saw that everyone was agitated, everyone was running, people, women… they were fainting, falling and we went outside to see what was happening."

            He said when he went outside and saw two people stabbing others, he at first "froze" and didn't know what to do. But then he went and hit one of the attackers on the head with a crate.

            "There was a car with a loudspeaker saying 'go, go' and they (police) threw a grenade…. and then I ran."

            He added that when he saw that "people were desperate," he let about 20 people into the bakery and pulled the shutters down.

            ___

            2:45 p.m.

            France's minister for Europe says that four French citizens are among the dozens of wounded in the London terror attack that killed seven people.

            Marielle de Sarnez expressed her condolences to the families affected and "absolute solidarity" with the British in a statement on Sunday.

            Meanwhile, French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe visited a crisis center at the French Foreign Ministry that fields calls from anxious citizens after attacks.

            Philippe noted the attack came as French living overseas begin voting in advance of June 11 first-round legislative elections. He said voting in London would continue with reinforced security.

            ___

            2:20 p.m.

            The British Transport Police chief says that an officer who was wounded in the London Bridge attack was armed only with his baton when he confronted the three knife-wielding assailants.

            The officer, who was stabbed in the face, head and a leg, was one of the first responders.

            British Transport Police Chief Constable Paul Crowther visited the officer at a hospital and said that he's in stable condition. Crowther said that "it became clear that he showed enormous courage in the face of danger."

            Crowther added that "for an officer who only joined us less than two years ago, the bravery he showed was outstanding and makes me extremely proud."

            Seven people died in the attack and dozens were wounded. In addition, the three attackers were killed by police.

            ___

            1:15 p.m.

            British police say they have arrested 12 people in east London over the attack in the London Bridge area.

            Police said in a statement that the arrests were made Sunday morning in Barking by counterterrorism officers.

            Officials said that seven people died in the Saturday night attack and roughly 48 were wounded. A British Transport Police officer and an off-duty officer were among the injured. In addition, three attackers were shot dead by police.

            Police say the investigation is progressing rapidly. Prime Minister Theresa May has blamed Islamic extremists.

            ___

            1 p.m.

            Britain's interior minister says the country's terrorism threat level will not be raised because police believe there are no perpetrators still on the loose.

            Home Secretary Amber Rudd says "we don't believe there are additional elements" at large.

            The level was raised to "critical" for several days after the March 22 concert bombing in Manchester, as police raced to track down the attacker's possible accomplices.

            It now stands at "severe," meaning an attack is highly likely.

            Three men were shot dead by police on Saturday, minutes after a van mowed into pedestrians on London Bridge and multiple people were stabbed around nearby Borough Market. Police say seven people were killed and 48 hospitalized.

            Rudd told ITV television that more must be done to fight the "onslaught of jihadi propaganda that is radicalizing people online."

            ___

            12:40 p.m.

            Arab Gulf countries and Turkey are condemning the attack in London that left six people dead and more than 40 others injured.

            The United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman and Kuwait issued separate statements condemning such attacks and expressing their support for the British government.

            The Saudi Embassy in the U.K. called on their citizens in London to exercise caution in crowded areas and follow police instructions.

            In Turkey, the foreign ministry has expressed its "deep sadness." The ministry says that as "Turkey and the Turkish people, who have been subjected to similar attacks many times, we understand and share the pain of the people of the United Kingdom."

            The ministry emphasized Turkey's readiness to support the U.K. in its fight against extremism

            ___

            12:10 p.m.

            The attack in London Bridge, a busy area filled with hotels and restaurants, has left many visitors and tourists stranded after police cordoned off a large area near the crime scene. Many spent the night in improvised sleeping spaces, from the floors of hotel bars or restaurants to chairs of conference rooms.

            Sue and Jason Dunt and a second couple, Richard and Michelle Orme, were out enjoying a post-matinee dinner on London's Embankment on Saturday. They tried to make it back to their hotel but were stymied by the police cordon thrown up around the attack site, and eventually found shelter in another hotel's conference room.

            "We were wandering the streets until three in the morning," said Richard, a 40-year-old retail worker.

            "There were people sleeping in the sofas in the reception and the restaurant. It was really good of them," he added.

            ___

            11:45 a.m.

            Pope Francis has offered prayers for the victims of the London attacks during a traditional Sunday blessing following Mass that marked the Pentecost holiday.

            Francis invoked prayers that the Holy Spirit "grants peace to the whole world and heal the wounds of war and of terrorism, which also last night, in London, struck innocent victims."

            The pope asked for prayers for the victims and their family members caught up in the attack in London Bridge Saturday, which left seven dead and almost 50 wounded.

            Pentecost concludes the Easter season.

            ___

            11:25 a.m.

            British media are reporting an armed police operation taking place in east London. Scotland Yard declined to comment about the reports of the raid, or say whether the operation was linked to Saturday's attacks in London Bridge.

            Footage from Sky News and social media show a police cordon around an apartment building in Barking, a suburb in east London.

            Authorities have said officers shot dead all three attackers in Saturday night's attack, which left seven people dead, but that the investigation is continuing.

            ___

            This version corrects the day of the attack to Saturday.

            ___

            11:15 a.m.

            Spain's Foreign Ministry says that one Spaniard is among the dozens wounded in the London attack.

            A ministry spokeswoman has told The Associated Press that the Spanish man has been taken to a hospital where he is being treated for wounds described as not serious. The spokeswoman spoke anonymously in line with ministry policy.

            Spain's King Felipe VI and Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy have expressed their condolences for the victims of the attacks.

            The Spanish Royal Family wrote on Twitter: "The British people will overcome this barbarism and senselessness. We are united today in pain and in our tireless defense of freedom."

            Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-06-04/the-latest-india-s-prime-minister-condemns-london-attacks